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Author: Jeremy Pope

Meritefnut should continue in life ( Ꜥnḫ ḥm.t-nṯr Mry.t-Tfnw.t ), followed immediately by a reference to Shepenwepet II as “living” ( Ꜥnḫ.tἰ ). If Meritefnut were the missing prenomen of Amenirdis II, then a co-tenure between her and Shepenwepet II appears unavoidable. Such an arrangement must not be

In: Journal of Egyptian History

vessels of choice and “workhorses” of ancient Egypt. So dominant was maritime life in the Egyptian worldview that the earth was imagined as floating on a universe of inert and dark primordial waters, known as nw or nwn . 15 It should not be surprising, then, that watercraft were an essential part of

In: Journal of Egyptian History

point linking ancient Egypt with modern Europe. The economist Peter Temin assumes that “ordinary Romans lived well […] as a result of extensive markets” 24 and this allows him to suggest that the average standard of living in the Roman world was close to that of the 17th century Netherlands. 25 In

In: Journal of Egyptian History

to pre- pare them in such a way that they are quali fi ed for jobs elsewhere in academia. These students and the discipline itself su ff er a loss if they must leave academia altogether in order to sustain a living, and thus can no longer contribute to the fi eld. The need for help- ing students fi nd

In: Journal of Egyptian History

exhibits figural and textual offerings on many subjects (religious, historical), in many media (carving, ink), and on a variety of canvasses (rock cliffs, temple walls). Inscriptional content reveals that rock inscription carving was motivated by many different primary goals: they could serve as

In: Journal of Egyptian History

individuals can be simultaneously linked to both state and patronage logics (for example, an individual who gains control over a territory as the result of his being part of a state elite, but who then exercises patronage prerogatives over the population living in that territory). Evidence of these kinds of

In: Journal of Egyptian History

. Late antiquity was an era of expansion for Christian liturgical life across the Mediterranean. A major feature of this development was the emergence during the fourth century of trained choirs for liturgical service, along with new forms of hymnography crafted to highlight their participation. 6 In

In: Wisdom on the Move: Late Antique Traditions in Multicultural Conversation

source document, Kannaday posits that scribes performed a systematic reworking of the transmissional lines. However, Kannaday claims there was no such systematic work. Even if there is some credence to the claim concerning apologetically motivated scribal alterations, it was in no way systematic

In: History of the Pauline Corpus in Texts, Transmissions and Trajectories

(to AD  300) has long been recognized as ‘wild,’ ‘uncontrolled,’ ‘unedited.’ ” 23 The wild development supposedly ended with a textual standardization motivated by ecclesiastical powers. As Parker explains, “the growth of influence of a number of key sees, particularly Antioch, Alexandria

In: History of the Pauline Corpus in Texts, Transmissions and Trajectories

the original words of the New Testament.” 83 The two scholars contended the many new finds and transcriptions by Tischendorf had thoroughly supplanted the late date of the mss. used to create the TR . The new material motivated and warranted creating a new text independent of the TR . 84

In: History of the Pauline Corpus in Texts, Transmissions and Trajectories