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25- ’DRAWING ALL TOGETHER IN ONE BOND OF LOVE’: THE ECUMENICAL VISION OF WILLIAM J. SEYMOUR AND THE AZUSA STREET REVIVAL Dale T. Irvin* New York Theological Seminary 5 West 29th St, New York, NY 10001, USA For the better part of the past century the Pentecostal and ecumenical movements have

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology

Richie ** 6926 Terry Drive Knoxville, TN, 37924 USA email: BrothrTony@aol.com A BSTRACT Even as we celebrate the centennial of the Azusa Street Revival, the ideol- ogy and reality of religious pluralism currently challenges Pentecostal Christians to articulate an adequate theology of religions. J.H. King

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology

presence and related themes are traced in this essay. Th e relevance of this message is explored for: the Chr’s community during the reconstruction period, the task of bibli- cal theology and the renewal tradition as it embarks upon another century after the Azusa Street Revival. Keywords sacred song

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology

Time. Included is a look at the possible intersection of the Spirit and the artist community, calling for deeper Pentecostal engagement with the arts. Keywords Azusa Street Revival , American Pentecostalism , Expressionism , art , Spirit baptism , experience , tongues , culture , sacred time I

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology

distinctive, even among Christians, about Pentecostal worship and hermeneutics? Pentecostal Worship Pentecostal worship in the early decades of the movement was often perceived as ‘disorderly’ by more mainline Protestants. Pentecostal worship services around the time of the Azusa Street Revival in 1906 gained

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology

led directly to the Pentecostal movement. Scholars who point to the Azusa Street revival of 1906 as the origin of the Pentecostal movement often emphasize Parham’s influence on W.J. Seymour53 over the African spirituality of Seymour’s Black Holiness prayer meeting.54 They also point to its inter

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology

the broader racist North American society. Yet, a narrative history discovering God in oppressive and reprehensible living conditions and African-style indigenous worship expressions had already equipped black believers since slavery for whatever slander they would face at the Azusa Street Revival

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology

Pentecostalism on a global scale with its 'bewildering pluralism' from a pentecostally informed, critical, missiological perspective. The definition of Pentecostalism is deliberately broad, so as to encompass a plethora of groups from the Azusa Street revival in Los Angeles in 1906 to the contemporary middle

In: Journal of Religion in Africa

there, numbering about 600,000 adherents. Th e start of the Pentecostal movement in Sweden was inspired by the well-known Azusa Street revival in Los Angeles, which began in 1906. As elsewhere, most Swedes who were attracted to the new movement were poor and not highly educated. Swedish Pentecostals

In: Journal of Religion in Africa

transformation of a diff use grassroots movement to a centralized, bureaucratic mega-church under a charismatic leader. Pentecostalism became a global movement soon after the Azusa Street Revival began in 1906. While based on a spiritual belief in the new birth of the individual, Pentecostalism also awakened a

In: Social Sciences and Missions