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East Central Europe is a peer-reviewed journal of social sciences and humanities with a focus on the region between the Baltic and the Adriatic, published in cooperation with the Central European University. The journal seeks to maintain the heuristic value of regional frameworks of interpretation as models of historical explanation, transcending the nation-state at sub-national or trans-national level, and to link them to global academic debates. East Central Europe has an interdisciplinary orientation, combining area studies with history and social sciences, most importantly political science, sociology, anthropology, and cultural studies. It aims to stimulate the dialogue and exchange between scholarship produced in and on East-Central Europe and other area study traditions, in a global context. East Central Europe is made in close cooperation with Pasts, Inc. in Central European University ( www.ceu.hu/pasts).

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Studies in Central European Histories is a peer-reviewed book series that presents original work and translations of the histories of the German-speaking and closely related peoples of Central Europe between the Middle Ages and the present. It aims to bring forward new and neglected perspectives on important subjects and issues in the histories of these peoples. The series is designed for advanced students and scholars of German and European history in the early modern and modern periods.

General Editors: David M. Luebke and Celia Applegate.

Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the Brill Open webpage.

The series published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.

Overseas Migration and Central European Migration History Vienna and Budapest, the two capitals of Austria-Hungary, were undergoing fundamental transformations in the course of the long nineteenth century: as capital cities, they were centres of industry and commerce as well as places where

In: Journal of Migration History

The nature of labor movements and their political involvement and impact has recently been a matter of academic as well as political concern, at global level. In this respect, post-communist transformation in Eastern Europe offers an interesting case study. In the second half of 2007, the journal East Central Europe organized a debate on political scientist David Ost’s pioneering book The Defeat of Solidarity: Anger and Politics in Postcommunist Europe. A study on socialist and postsocialist political culture, the book focuses on the evolution of Solidarność (Solidarity) in Poland over two decades, 1980–2000. While accounting for the Polish postsocialist path to what might be called “popular illiberalism,” Ost also tackles wider issues concerning processes of democratization in times of crisis. This debate includes five short polemical essays written by three graduate students (Kacper Pobłocki, Tibor T. Meszmann, and Gábor Halmai), one junior scholar (Eszter Bartha) and one senior scholar (Don Kalb). The authors are trained in different disciplines (anthropology, political science, and history) and are specializing in the history of different countries (Poland, Hungary, Serbia, and Slovenia), thus adding to the debate a variety of disciplinary and national perspectives. The reviewers acknowledge the paramount importance of Ost’s book, calling it “a mustread” for all scholars interested in East European politics and labor movements. They commend the author for bringing the concept of class back to postsocialist analyses, and for addressing a set of important interdisciplinary theoretical and methodological questions. At the same time, the reviewers question Ost’s eclectic methodology on various grounds, criticizing it mainly for a lack of “temporal tracking,” for placing too much “causal weight” on “elite discourses” in producing the turn to illiberalism at the expense of anthropological research at grass-roots level, and for assigning too little agency to non-elites and the “worker-citizens.” In his response, David Ost clarifies the theoretical framework and main arguments of his book and further elaborates on his position, both conceptually and empirically. He advances a normative argument for consolidating democracy in Eastern Europe, arguing that “political entrepreneurs must rethink, reimagine, recontextualize the concept of class, and must try to make conflicts over interests more appealing to the populace than conflicts over identities.”

In: East Central Europe
The Siege of Szigetvár and the Death of Süleyman the Magnificent and Nicholas Zrínyi (1566)
Editor: Pál Fodor
In The Battle for Central Europe specialists in sixteenth-century Ottoman, Habsburg and Hungarian history provide the most comprehensive picture possible of a battle that determined the fate of Central Europe for centuries. Not only the siege and the death of its main protagonists are discussed, but also the wider context of the imperial rivalry and the empire buildings of the competing great powers of that age.

Contributors include Gábor Ágoston, János B. Szabó, Zsuzsa Barbarics-Hermanik, Günhan Börekçi, Feridun M. Emecen, Alfredo Alvar Ezquerra, István Fazekas, Pál Fodor, Klára Hegyi, Colin Imber, Damir Karbić, József Kelenik, Zoltán Korpás, Tijana Krstić, Nenad Moačanin, Gülru Neci̇poğlu, Erol Özvar, Géza Pálffy, Norbert Pap, Peter Rauscher, Claudia Römer, Arno Strohmeyer, Zeynep Tarım, James D. Tracy, Gábor Tüskés, Szabolcs Varga, Nicolas Vatin.
Author: Herbert Schutz
This book presents an historical overview of the Frankish realms in Central Europe during the Carolingian period. Against this background Part II of the book examines the cultural inventory deposited by the scribal culture in Central Europe as represented by manuscripts, crystals, ivories and gem encrusted liturgical art. Part III deals with such examples of Carolingian wall painting and architecture as are still evident in Central Europe. Though some examples are derivative, many are original. To reflect the splendor of the objects and surfaces discussed in Parts II and III, the book is lavishly ornamented with pertinent color illustrations. Black and white illustrations generally serve the representation of architecture.
Contemplation and Commemoration in Early Modern Poland-Lithuania
In Visual Cultures of Death in Central Europe, Aleksandra Koutny-Jones explores the emergence of a remarkable cultural preoccupation with death in Poland-Lithuania (1569-1795). Examining why such interests resonated so strongly in the Baroque art of this Commonwealth, she argues that the printing revolution, the impact of the Counter-Reformation, and multiple afflictions suffered by Poland-Lithuania all contributed to a deep cultural concern with mortality.
Introducing readers to a range of art, architecture and material culture, this study considers various visual evocations of death including 'Dance of Death' imagery, funerary decorations, coffin portraiture, tomb chapels and religious landscapes. These, Koutny-Jones argues, engaged with wider European cultures of contemplation and commemoration, while also being critically adapted to the specific context of Poland-Lithuania.
Ethnic Diversity, Denominational Plurality, and Corporative Politics in the Principality of Transylvania (1526-1691)
Author: István Keul
Conceived as another chapter in the European history of religions (Europäische Religionsgeschichte), this book deals with the intense dynamics of the overlapping political, ethnic, and denominational constellations in Reformation and post-Reformation Transylvania. Navigating along multiple narrative tracks, and attempting to treat the religious history of an entire region – over a limited time period – in a differentiated, polyfocal way, the book represents a departure from the master narratives of any singularly oriented religious history. At the same time, the present work seeks to contribute to laying the groundwork at the micro- and meso-contextual level of East-Central European confessionalization processes, and to developing interpretive models for these processes in the region.
This series, publication under the auspices of the Centre for Copernican Studies of the Polish Academy of Science presents a forum for publications on Copernicus' work, the related problems of his time, and the impact of his ideas as well as for studies in the scientific and broader intellectual traditions of the central European countries.
A Companion to the Reformation in Central Europe analyses the diverse Christian cultures of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Czech lands, Austria, and lands of the Hungarian kingdom between the 15th and 18th centuries. It establishes the geography of Reformation movements across this region, and then considers different movements of reform and the role played by Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox clergy. This volume examines different contexts and social settings for reform movements, and investigates how cities, princely courts, universities, schools, books, and images helped spread ideas about reform. This volume brings together expertise on diverse lands and churches to provide the first integrated account of religious life in Central Europe during the early modern period.

Contributors are: Phillip Haberkern, Maciej Ptaszyński, Astrid von Schlachta, Márta Fata, Natalia Nowakowska, Luka Ilić, Michael Springer, Edit Szegedi, Mihály Balázs, Rona Johnston Gordon, Howard Louthan, Tadhg Ó hAnnracháin, Liudmyla Sharipova, Alexander Schunka, Rudolf Schlögl, Václav Bůžek, Mark Hengerer, Michael Tworek, Pál Ács, Maria Crăciun, Grażyna Jurkowlaniec, Laura Lisy-Wagner, and Graeme Murdock.