Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 95 items for :

  • All: "DEMOCRATIZATION" x
  • Sociology of Religion x
Clear All

. 48 In Hinduism, the adoption of media and technology in the religious sphere has fostered a process of democratization in ritual participation, which undermines traditional restrictions imposed by the caste system (see Scheifinger 2015 49 ); there have also been critical responses to the

In: Review of Religion and Chinese Society

Investigation of Beijing Intellectual House Church Activities and Their Implications for China’s Democratization .” Journal of Contemporary China 19 : 849 – 864 . Wright Teresa , and Zimmerman-Liu Teresa . 2013 . “ Atheist Political Activists Turned Protestants: Religious

In: Review of Religion and Chinese Society
Author: Fenggang Yang

opposes gay rights. Under the authoritarian regimes of the past, theologically conservative Christians in Taiwan were very much apolitical. In the democratized Taiwan today, however, these conservative Christians have become active agents mobilizing to influence legislation. Interestingly, they have

In: Review of Religion and Chinese Society

human rights revolution during the “third wave of democratization” from the mid-1970s to the 1990s. Furthermore, “the church has remained one of the public voices left still questioning capitalist globalization and demanding the humanization and moralization of market economies and more just and fair

In: Review of Religion and Chinese Society
Author: Carsten Vala

challenge simplistic faith among believers. Wielander interrogates the potential for Christian elites to link to the masses—by moving from theory to political action (democratization)—and to the world in Chapter 6 (“Christian Intellectuals, Bridging the Gap?”). She finds that deep divisions separate urban

In: Review of Religion and Chinese Society
Author: Joshua L. Mann

literature that (1) emphasise the inclusion of non-canonical texts and (2) are not done primarily in ‘service to the church and Christian faith’. This leads to the conclusion later in the chapter that the ‘digital turn’ has led to “a kind of democratization of ancient texts” (p. 55)—a significant and

In: Journal of Religion, Media and Digital Culture

dictatorships of the 1980s have given way to democratic governance across the continent and, consequently, “democratization” of the media landscape. A number of repressive and retrogressive censorship regulations relating to media access and use have been abolished. Secondly, this democratization of the media

In: Journal of Religion, Media and Digital Culture

—Investigating China’s Democratisation during Its Modernisation.” PhD diss., Durham University . 1 Earlier versions of these texts were presented at a conference convened by Professor Hung-yok Ip at Oregon State University, Corvallis, under the broad theme of “Religion, Resistance Movements, and

In: Review of Religion and Chinese Society

martial law and the subsequent self-identification of many Taiwanese along national, ethnic, or political lines. Alan Wachman (1994:18–22) echoes this stance by arguing that national identity crystallized as the democratization process rose from the ashes of military rule. He also couches Taiwaneseness

In: Review of Religion and Chinese Society
Author: Moumita Sen

Age . Cambridge : Polity Press . Chandhoke N. ( 2001 ). The ‘Civil’ and the ‘Political’ in Civil Society . Democratization 8 ( 2 ), pp. 1 – 24 . Chatterjee P. ( 2004 ). The Politics of the Governed: Reflections on Popular Politics in Most of the

In: Journal of Religion, Media and Digital Culture