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In: A Concise Encyclopedia of the United Nations

article takes an initial step toward understanding if and how IC s improve or weaken the presence of democratic values in international lawmaking. In particular, I home in on one feature of the institutional design of IC s and ask what potential role it plays in democratizing international lawmaking

In: Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations
The nonprofit sector and civil society are emerging in many nations all over the world, with NGOs of various kinds (associations, agencies, foundations, social enterprises, and volunteer programs) proliferating rapidly. Academic scholarship is emerging or expanding globally even faster than the underlying nonprofit sector itself. A new label for this interdisciplinary field is Voluntaristics, which refers to Nonprofit Sector and Voluntary Action Research, including studies of the kinds of groups noted above but also individual volunteering, both formal and informal.

The books of the Series focus on all aspects of Voluntaristics as an international and interdisciplinary field and as an emerging academic discipline. Included are chapters on topics such as the nonprofit sector, voluntary sector, third sector, civil society (sector), social economy, solidarity economy, social enterprise, social entrepreneurship, social investment, solidarity, philanthropy, giving, grants economy, foundations, volunteering (both formal and informal), civic engagement, community engagement, engagement, citizen participation, participation, nonprofit, not-for-profit, nonprofit organizations (NPOs), nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), voluntary associations, associations, sodalities, self-help groups, mutual aid groups, support groups, interest groups, pressure groups, cooperatives, nonprofit agencies, civil liberties, democracy, democratization, social movements, social protest, and mobilization, among other topics. The Series includes English translations of scholarly works or collections of papers originally written in a language that is not English, aiming at bringing these important non-English materials available to English-speaking readers.

Another unique feature of the book series is that the umbrella/infrastructure organization, ICSERA, of which Series Co-Editor David Horton Smith is the founder and CEO/President, has sponsored the Book Series. Prof. Chao Guo of the University of Pennsylvania and Senior Vice-President of ICSERA is the Co-Editor of the Series. ICSERA (www.icsera.org) refers to the International Council of Voluntarism, Civil Society, and Social Economy Researcher Associations, a nonprofit research organization based in the USA.
Editor: Helmut Volger
How can we approach the complex United Nations system, a ‘family’of principal organs, subsidiary organs and specialized agencies? Where do we get summarizing information on the large number of reform concepts developed and implemented since the late 1990s, in particular in connection with the UN World Summit 2005?
The present book provides orientation and information: It is the second updated English edition of the German "Lexikon der Vereinten Nationen". The book provides in addition to concise and comprehensive information on the UN system insight into recent UN developments and reform efforts in the face of global opportunities and challenges, such as the Millennium Summit 2000 and World Summit 2005, and the establishment of important new UN organs, the Human Rights Council and the Peacebuilding Commission, in 2006.
The contributing authors are academic scholars of international law, economics and political sciences; active and former diplomats and UN officials; journalists and members of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and offer a variety of interesting perspectives.
The entries are provided with bibliographies and with Internet addresses for further information and are supplemented in the annex by an informative text on the UN document numbering system and by a list of information facilities concerning the UN.

This title was reviewed as „essential“ (highest category of recommendation) by Choice – Current Reviews for Academic Libraries in October 2010.

'A new edition of a mammoth, 900-page-plus encyclopedia covering every aspect of the United Nations and its work is now available in English in the United States… Among its many useful features are exhaustive lists of those bewildering UN acronyms, a key to decoding (and thus knowing how to look for) UN documents and a complete copy of the UN Charter. The easy-to-use alphabetical order of entries makes it easy for schoolchildren and adults to navigate.' Barbara Crossette in: The InterDependent, 4 October 2010 (www.theinterdependent.com).

'This multidirectional compass is extraordinarily well researched and written. It is a veritable research dream, without which no international collection could possibly be complete'. American Society of International Law, Newsletter of the UN21 Interest Group, January 2011

'This is an update... [of the 2002 edition], with articles contributed by a number of experts on the United Nations and international relations. Entries are either wholly updated or the original article is updated with a signed addendum, making the information current as of the end of 2008. Articles are very detailed and include copious references to other parts of the volume, indicated with an arrow. Most entries conclude with a bibliography of works useful for further research, many of which are extensive reviews of the literature on a particular topic in multiple languages. Entries range from overviews of the workings of the United Nations (including budget, membership rules, and organization) to more theoretical discussions of international law. …[The book] will be indispensable for any research university with faculty in international relations or law. Summing Up: Essential. Graduate students and researchers/faculty. T. Miller, Michigan State University, Review in October 2010 in Choice – Current Reviews for Academic Libraries.'


Democracy Assessments in Eight Nations Around the World
The State of Democracy: Democracy Assessments in Eight Nations Around the World is the robust and sensitive study of democratisation in eight very different countries at varying stages of democratisation – Bangladesh, El Salvador, Italy, Kenya, Malawi, New Zealand,
Peru and South Korea. This unique comparative study first presents the findings of in-country teams of experts in the eight countries on the state of democracy in their own country; and concludes with an analysis and synthesis of their findings to suggest an overall general trajectory of the democratisation process. In doing so, the conclusions examine a variety of issues of significance to democracy, including for example the creation of electoral space, the formation of political parties, the political inclusion of minorities, mechanisms of accountability, and the reduction of corruption.
The strength of The State of Democracy lies in the common use by the eight teams of the
same democracy assessment framework developed under the auspices of the
International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (International IDEA), Stockholm. This innovative assessment framework covers every aspect of democracy: citizen rights and the rule of law, representative and accountable government, civil society and popular participation, and the international dimensions of democracy. The
expert teams used the same methodology to answer the same questions: how democratic
are we? In what respects have we made progress? What are the major defects of our
governing arrangements from a democratic point of view? How do we stand in comparison with our past and with other comparator countries?
Thus their findings are both comprehensive and directly comparable. The State of Democracy contains summaries of each democracy assessment; presents detailed comparative data on key democratic indicators for the eight countries; and then concludes with an overall analysis. The eight studies were pilot schemes, funded and organised by International IDEA, to validate and test the democracy assessment
framework, set out in the companion volume, The International IDEA Handbook on
Democracy Assessment
, also published by Brill. Some studies are also
being published separately in their country of origin as promotional tools for democratic
reform. International IDEA is continuing to cumulate these comparative studies and
analysis of democratic trends around the world, see www.idea.int.
Democracy Assessments in Eight Nations Around the World
The State of Democracy: Democracy Assessments in Eight Nations Around the World is the robust and sensitive study of democratisation in eight very different countries at varying stages of democratisation - Bangladesh, El Salvador, Italy, Kenya, Malawi, New Zealand, Peru and South Korea. This unique comparative study first presents the findings of in-country teams of experts in the eight countries on the state of democracy in their own country; and concludes with an analysis and synthesis of their findings to suggest an overall general trajectory of the democratisation process. In doing so, the conclusions examine a variety of issues of significance to democracy, including for example the creation of electoral space, the formation of political parties, the political inclusion of minorities, mechanisms of accountability, and the reduction of corruption.
The strength of The State of Democracy lies in the common use by the eight teams of the same democracy assessment framework developed under the auspices of the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (International IDEA), Stockholm. This innovative assessment framework covers every aspect of democracy: citizen rights and the rule of law, representative and accountable government, civil society and popular participation, and the international dimensions of democracy. The expert teams used the same methodology to answer the same questions: how democratic are we? In what respects have we made progress? What are the major defects of our governing arrangements from a democratic point of view? How do we stand in comparison with our past and with other comparator countries?
Thus their findings are both comprehensive and directly comparable. The State of Democracy contains summaries of each democracy assessment; presents detailed comparative data on key democratic indicators for the eight countries; and then concludes with an overall analysis. The eight studies were pilot schemes, funded and organised by International IDEA, to validate and test the democracy assessment framework, set out in the companion volume, The International IDEA Handbook on Democracy Assessment, also published by Kluwer Law International. Some studies are also being published separately in their country of origin as promotional tools for democratic reform. International IDEA is continuing to cumulate these comparative studies and analysis of democratic trends around the world, see www.idea.int.
The State of Democracy: Democracy Assessments in Eight Nations Around the World comprises: an introduction explaining the methodology being used; summary findings in systematic form for each of the eight countries; comparative tables covering a range of democratic features in both qualitative and quantitative aspects; a conclusion drawing out the implications of the country findings for the future of democratisation generally. The book will be of value to all those interested in the progress of democracy, whether as academics, practitioners or citizens, and in finding effective ways to assess it.
The International IDEA Handbook on Democracy Assessment is a robust and sensitive guide to assessing the quality of democracy and human rights in any country around the world. The Handbook introduces an easy-to-use and universal methodology for assessing the condition of democracy in any country, or its progress in democratisation, that has been developed in a three-year action programme at IDEA, the inter-governmental Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance in Sweden.
The Handbook provides a means to measure systematically the full range of values, institutions and issues relating to modern democracy that is sensitive to the underlying principles and democracy and the differences between democracies themselves. It is therefore both universal in application and capable of responding to particular aspects of any one nation's democratic arrangements. The animating principle of the Handbook is that only citizens of a nation themselves are qualified to assess the quality of their own democratic arrangements. Thus, it provides a self-help guide, which gives academics, lawyers, political practitioners, journalists and interested citizens the tools to assess the state of their democracy, or any key aspects of their democracy.
The Handbook is above all a practical working document that draws on the actual experience of assessing democracy in different countries, comparative knowledge and research, and democratic principles and practice. It gives a step-by-step guide to the purposes and methods of democracy assessment; who to involve; how to use the research tools; how to validate the findings; what standards of practice to adopt; and how to present and publicise a finished assessment. It contains extracts from completed assessments, guidance on the use of qualitative and quantitative data, examples of codes of democratic practice and international and regional standards, and a vast list of accessible data sources.
The methodology was created by a team of political scientists assembled from all regions of the world by International IDEA and has been tried and tested in a variety of countries, including Bangladesh, El Salvador, Italy, Kenya, Malawi, New Zealand, Peru, South Korea and the United Kingdom. International organisations like the World Bank and UNECA are adapting it for in-country use. The four main authors and editors have been directly involved from the inception of the project - in developing and refining the methodology and participating in and advising on the nine country studies that form the essential practical core of experience on which this invaluable Handbook is based.

democratization process of 2000, Mexico’s diplomats used international treaties and statues on human rights to anchor domestic reforms and frame national laws. In this sense, the R2P debate had more of a second image-reversed dimension, 5 as diplomats used evolving international norms about human rights to shape

In: Global Responsibility to Protect

Rights and Democratisation in Venice, Italy. She gained working experiences at National Human Rights Institutions (Hungary, Germany), and in the eu Agency for Fundamental Rights (Austria). She graduated from the Faculty of Law at the University of Pécs (Hungary, 2006) and she holds an LL.M. in

In: Global Responsibility to Protect

Yugoslav statehood movement and the Tito experiment; the failure of later democratisation efforts (more about that in a moment). We can speak also about the failure of Europe as a model for and enforcer of national integrity, the failure of the United Nations, the failure of NATO and the failure, to some

In: Journal of International Peacekeeping