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Popularizing Anti-Semitism in Early Modern Spain and its Empire

Francisco de Torrejoncillo and the Centinela contra Judíos (1674)

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Francois Soyer

This book charts the history and influence of the most vitriolic and successful anti-Semitic polemic ever to have been printed in the early modern Hispanic world and offers the first critical edition and translation of the text into English. First printed in Madrid in 1674, the Centinela contra judíos (“Sentinel against the Jews”) was the work of the Franciscan Francisco de Torrejoncillo, who wrote it to defend the mission of the Spanish Inquisition, to call for the expansion of discriminatory racial statutes and, finally, to advocate in favour of the expulsion of all the descendants of converted Jews from Spain and its empire. Francisco de Torrejoncillo combined the existing racial, theological, social and economic strands within Spanish anti-Semitism to demonize the Jews and their converted descendants in Spain in a manner designed to provoke strong emotional responses from its readership.

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Efraim Wust

The Yahuda Collection was bequeathed to the National Library of Israel by one of the twentieth century's most knowledgeable and important collectors, Abraham Shalom Yahuda (d. 1951). The rich and multifaceted collection of 1,186 manuscripts, spanning ten centuries, includes works representing the major Islamic disciplines and literary traditions. Highlights include illuminated manuscripts from Mamluk, Mughal, and Ottoman court libraries; rare, early copies of medieval scholarly treatises; and early modern autograph copies.

In this groundbreaking Arabic catalogue, Efraim Wust synthesizes the Islamic and Western manuscript traditions to enrich our understanding of the manuscripts and their compositions. His combined treatment of Arabic, Persian, and Turkish manuscripts preserves the integrity of the collection and honors the multicultural history of the Islamic intellectual tradition.

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Eveline van Staalduine-Sulman

. 123 John Considine, Dictionaries in Early Modern Europe: Lexicography and the Making of Heritage (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), 39. 124 Carlo Ginzburg, Clues, Myths, and the Historical Method (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013), 56–57. 125 Cf. Febvre & Martin, The

Series:

Eveline van Staalduine-Sulman

Beyerlinck, ‘Ad Christianum Lectorum Praefatio’, in: Biblia Sacra , 4r. 60 See further Calvin Lane, The Laudians and the Elizabethan Church: History, Conformity and Religious Identity in Post-Reformation England (Religious Cultures in the Early Modern World; Oxon & New York: Routledge, 2016), 46, 53

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Eveline van Staalduine-Sulman

, and the Cultures of Print’, in: Kevin Killeen et al. (eds), The Oxford Handbook of the Bible in Early Modern England 1530–1700 (Oxford: University Press, 2015), 224–36, esp. 224. 3 Gribben, ‘The Commodification of Scripture’, 231. 4 Gribben, ‘The Commodification of Scripture’, 232. 5 Brian Walton

Illuminating in Micrography

The Catalan Micrography Mahzor−MS Heb 8°6527 in the National Library of Israel

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Dalia-Ruth Halperin

In Illuminating in Micrography, Dalia-Ruth Halperin analyzes the Catalan Micrography Maḥzor, a fourteenth-century Barcelonan manuscript in Israel’s National Library. Decorated with micrography, the Jewish scribal art typical of Bible manuscripts, this maḥzor, which includes a rich full-page panel micrography cycle, is unique.
Along with the codicological and paleographical analysis, essential for understanding the scribe’s thought and working processes, the author’s meticulous reading of the micrography text reveals the scribe’s textual editing and manipulations. Decoding his writing flow and sequences revealed a close association between the penned text and the images formed, which reflect a Jewish theosophical-theurgical cycle. Evidence of the scribe’s association with the renowned Bassa atelier enhances our knowledge of the cultural, economic, and ethnic realities of the time.

Series:

Eveline van Staalduine-Sulman

censored text from the Antwerp Polyglot Bible. During this century and a half Christian Hebraism and Aramaism changed in early modern Europe: it made Jewish learning possible without any assistance from Jews 2 —an aim that the Spanish Cardinal had already set in the introductions to the Complutensian