Search Results

Series:

Manon van der Heijden

Crime is men’s business, isn’t it? Women are responsible for 10 percent of crime in Europe. Yet, if we look at the Dutch Republic in the early modern period, we find that in the towns of Holland women played a much larger role in crime. In a number of early modern towns about half of the criminals convicted in court were women. These women were in vulnerable positions and thus more likely to become involved in crime. They also had a relatively independent status and led remarkably public lives. Manon van der Heijden convincingly shows that it is the very combination of women’s vulnerability and independence that accounts for the high female crime rates in Holland between 1600 and 1800.

The Vacant See in Early Modern Rome

A Social History of the Papal Interregnum

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John M. Hunt

In The Vacant See in Early Modern Rome John M. Hunt offers a social history of the papal interregnum from 1559 to 1655. The study concentrates on the Roman people’s relationship with their sacred ruler. Using criminal sources from the Archivio di Stato di Roma and Vatican sources, Hunt emphasizes the violent and tumultuous nature of the lapse in papal authority that followed the pope’s death. The vacant see was a time in which Romans of modest social backgrounds claimed unprecedented power. From personal acts of revenge to collective protests staged at the Capitol Hill and citywide discussions of the papal election the vacant see provided Romans with a unique opportunity for political involvement in an age of omnipresent hierarchy.

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Edited by Justyna Wubs-Mrozewicz and Stuart Jenks

The Hanse, an organization of towns and traders in medieval and early modern Europe,
was a unique phenomenon. At the same time, it was embedded in the northern European urban and mercantile culture. The contributions in this volume therefore seek to highlight the atypical features of the Hanse, and place them in a wider context of common roots, influences and parallel developments. New research is presented on the origin and growth of the Hanse, the organization of trade, legal history, interaction with non-Hansards and transitions in the Hanse in the early modern period. Moreover, the historiography of the Hanse, problems of source criticism and possibilities for future research are discussed. The volume is an inspiring guide to Hanse studies.
Contributors are Carsten Jahnke, Edda Frankot, Sofia Gustafsson, James M. Murray, Mike Burkhardt, Marie-Louise Pelus-Kaplan, Stuart Jenks, and Justyna Wubs-Mrozewicz.

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Edited by Theresa Earenfight

In this volume, the authors bring fresh approaches to the subject of royal and noble households in medieval and early modern Europe. The essays focus on the people of the highest social rank: the nuclear and extended royal family, their household attendants, noblemen and noblewomen as courtiers, and physicians. Themes include financial and administrative management, itinerant households, the household of an imprisoned noblewoman, blended households, and cultural influence. The essays are grounded in sources such as records of court ceremonial, economic records, letters, legal records, wills, and inventories. The authors employ a variety of methods, including prosopography, economic history, visual analysis, network analysis, and gift exchange, and the collection is engaged with current political, sociological, anthropological, gender, and feminist theories.

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Edited by Maya Corry, Marco Faini and Alessia Meneghin

Domestic Devotions in Early Modern Italy illuminates the vibrancy of spiritual beliefs and practices which profoundly shaped family life in this era. Scholarship on Catholicism has tended to focus on institutions, but the home was the site of religious instruction and reading, prayer and meditation, communal worship, multi-sensory devotions, contemplation of religious images and the performance of rituals, as well as extraordinary events such as miracles. Drawing on a wide range of sources, this volume affirms the central place of the household to spiritual life and reveals the myriad ways in which devotion met domestic needs. The seventeen essays encompass religious history, the histories of art and architecture, material culture, musicology, literary history, and social and cultural history.

Contributors are Erminia Ardissino, Michele Bacci, Michael J. Brody, Giorgio Caravale, Maya Corry, Remi Chiu, Sabrina Corbellini, Stefano Dall’Aglio, Marco Faini, Iain Fenlon, Irene Galandra Cooper, Jane Garnett, Joanna Kostylo, Alessia Meneghin, Margaret A. Morse, Elisa Novi Chavarria, Gervase Rosser, Zuzanna Sarnecka, Katherine Tycz, and Valeria Viola.

The Portuguese Slave Trade in Early Modern Japan

Merchants, Jesuits and Japanese, Chinese, and Korean Slaves

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Lúcio De Sousa

In The Portuguese Slave Trade in Early Modern Japan: Merchants, Jesuits and Japanese, Chinese, and Korean Slaves Lucio de Sousa offers a study on the system of traffic of Japanese, Chinese, and Korean slaves from Japan. Using the Portuguese mercantile networks, de Sousa reconstructs the Japanese communities in the Habsburg Empire; and analyses the impact of the Japanese slave trade on the Iberian legislation produced in the 16th and first half of the 17th centuries.

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Edited by Carme Font Paz and Nina Geerdink

Economic Imperatives for Women’s Writing in Early Modern Europe delves into the early modern history of women’s authorship and literary production in Europe taking a material turn. The case studies included in the volume represent women writers from various European countries and comparatively reflect the nuances of their participation in a burgeoning commercial market for authors while profiting as much from patronage. From self-representation as professional writers to literary reception, the challenges of reputation, financial hardships, and relationships with editors and colleagues, the essays in this collection show from different theoretical standpoints and linguistic areas that gender biases played a far less limiting role in women’s literary writing than is commonly assumed, while they determined the relationship between moneymaking, self-representation, and publishing strategies.

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Elvira Vilches

1 Introduction Like for us today, money in Early Modern Spain meant wealth and income. Then as now lending, borrowing, and owing were ordinary experiences of everyday life. The dynamics of exchange also illustrate how money reduced qualities into sums and figures, instigating a shift of values from

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Edited by Diana Bullen Presciutti

Space, Place, and Motion: Locating Confraternities in the Late Medieval and Early Modern City offers the first sustained comparative examination of the relationship between confraternal life and the spaces of the late medieval and early modern city. By considering cities large (Rome) and small (Aalst) in regions as disparate as Ireland and Mexico, the essays collected here seek to uncover the commonalities and differences in confraternal practice as they played out on the urban stage. From the candlelit oratory to the bustling piazza, from the hospital ward to the festal table, from the processional route to the execution grounds, late medieval and early modern cities, this interdisciplinary book contends, were made up of fluid and contested ‘confraternal spaces.’
Contributors are: Kira Maye Albinsky, Meryl Bailey, Cormac Begadon, Caroline Blondeau-Morizot, Danielle Carrabino, Andrew Chen, Ellen Decraene, Laura Dierksmeier, Ellen Alexandra Dooley, Douglas N. Dow, Anu Mänd, Rebekah Perry, Pamela A.V. Stewart, Arie van Steensel, and Barbara Wisch.

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Edward Behrend-Martínez

the royal authority of the Spanish monarch and the growth of state power in the Early Modern period. And yet, though relatively limited, popular culture aided in increasing royal authority and the crown’s ability to affect the lives of citizens more and more over the course of the 15th to the 17th