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John Duns Scotus (1265/6-1308)

Renewal of Philosophy. Acts of the Third Symposium Organized by the Dutch Society for Medieval Philosophy Medium Aevum

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Edited by E.P. Bos

This volume contains 14 studies on various aspects of Duns Scotus' philosophy. Duns Scotus (ca. 1265-1308/9) is one of the most important philosophers of the Middle Ages. His radical conception of contingency means a break in the history of thought. Despite his importance, he has not yet been studied very much. The contributors to the volume discuss a.o. Duns' view on will and intellect, on the law of nature, on man, and on aspects of his logic and metaphysics.

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Edited by Simon J.G. Burton, Joshua Hollmann and Eric M. Parker

Nicholas of Cusa and Early Modern Reform sheds new light on Cusanus’ relationship to early modernity by focusing on the reform of church, the reform of theology, the reform of perspective, and the reform of method – which together aim to encompass the breadth and depth of Cusanus’ own reform initiatives. In particular, in examining the way in which he served as inspiration for a wide and diverse array of reform-minded philosophers, ecclesiastics, theologians, and lay scholars in the midst of their struggle for the renewal and restoration of the individual, society, and the world, our volume combines a focus on Cusanus as a paradigmatic thinker with a study of his concrete influence on early modern thought. This volume is aimed at scholars working in the field of late medieval and early modern philosophy, theology, and history of science.
As the first Anglophone volume to explore the early modern reception of Nicholas of Cusa, this work will provide an important complement to a growing number of companions focusing on his life and thought.

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Matthew T. Gaetano

Nicholas of Cusa’s teaching on God as the complicatio or enfolding of the world led to accusations of pantheism in his own day and in a nineteenth-century scholarly tradition that is still being challenged in contemporary scholarship. 1 But the early modern dimension of this story has not

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Alberto Clerici

) again. This possibly offers an explanation for the limited number of editions of Cusanus’ works in early modern Italy. 26 The cardinal from Kues appears once again in the History of the Council of Trent , mentioned during a delicate session in 1546 discussing the problem of the interpretation of Holy

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Nathan R. Strunk

In the early modern period theologians reformulated the relation between God and the cosmos to accommodate dramatic shifts in understanding the nature of motion and space precipitated by developments in early modern science. An instance of such reform can already be found in Nicholas of Cusa (c

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Simon J.G. Burton, Joshua Hollmann and Eric M. Parker

“doorkeeper” could at times be ambiguous. 37 By comparison, Louis Dupré’s acclaimed 1993 work Passage to Modernity left little room for ambiguity. Drawing on Henri de Lubac’s controversial Surnaturel , he launched a frontal attack on Blumenberg’s thesis. For Dupré the late Middle Ages and early modern

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John Buridan

Edited by Michiel Streijger and Paul J.J.M. Bakker

John Buridan (d. ca. 1360) was one of the most talented and influential philosophers of the later Middle Ages. He spent his career as a master in the Arts Faculty at the University of Paris, producing commentaries and independent treatises on logic, metaphysics, natural philosophy, and ethics. His Questions Commentary on the eight books of Aristotle's Physics is the most important witness to Buridan's teachings in the field of natural philosophy. The commentary was widely read during the later Middle Ages and the Renaissance. This volume presents the first critical edition of books III and IV of the final redaction of Buridan's Questions Commentary on the Physics. The critical edition of the Latin text is accompanied by a detailed guide to the contents of Buridan's questions.

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John Buridan

Edited by M. Streijger and P. J.J.M. Bakker

John Buridan (d. ca. 1360) was one of the most talented and influential philosophers of the later Middle Ages. He spent his career as a master in the Arts Faculty at the University of Paris, producing commentaries and independent treatises on logic, metaphysics, natural philosophy, and ethics. His Questions Commentary on the eight books of Aristotle's Physics is the most important witness to Buridan's teachings in the field of natural philosophy. The commentary was widely read during the later Middle Ages and the Renaissance. This volume presents the first critical edition of books I & II of the final redaction of Buridan's Questions Commentary on the Physics. The critical edition of the Latin text is accompanied by a detailed guide to the contents of Buridan's questions.

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Edited by Michiel Streijger, Paul J.J.M. Bakker and Hans J. Thijssen

John Buridan (d. 1361) was one of the most talented and influential philosophers of the late Middle Ages. His fame extended far into the seventeenth century and underwent a revival in the twentieth century, when the French physicist Pierre Duhem rediscovered his manuscripts and wrote studies about them. So far, very few of Buridan's works have been edited. Two different questions commentaries on Aristotle's De generatione et corruptione by Buridan have been preserved. They originated in his classroom. Neither of them has ever been edited. This book presents a critical edition of the question commentary that survived in the greater number of manuscripts, and which was particularly popular at Central European universities.

Medieval and Early Modern Science, 14