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David Bradnick

as – or claim to be – possessed? Although materialistic explanations tend to ground the social-scientific and anthropological disciplines and the earlier premodern and early modern views presumed Aristotelian and then Cartesian ontologies that defined things in terms of substances, they are

Series:

David Bradnick

modernity, beginning with the Reformation and extending to the end of the classical modern period. 1 I divide this historical sketch into two sections. The first thematically surveys the mainstream of early modern demonology by focusing upon novel methods that these Christians designed to thwart demonic

Series:

David Bradnick

modernity, beginning with the Reformation and extending to the end of the classical modern period. 1 I divide this historical sketch into two sections. The first thematically surveys the mainstream of early modern demonology by focusing upon novel methods that these Christians designed to thwart demonic

Series:

David Bradnick

as – or claim to be – possessed? Although materialistic explanations tend to ground the social-scientific and anthropological disciplines and the earlier premodern and early modern views presumed Aristotelian and then Cartesian ontologies that defined things in terms of substances, they are

Series:

David Bradnick

demonic possession. This led to the formulation of new exorcism practices in the early modern Church. D Conclusion This survey reveals that demonology took on many different forms within the early Church, but by the time of the medieval era consensus concerning demonological beliefs had emerged from

Series:

David Bradnick

demonic possession. This led to the formulation of new exorcism practices in the early modern Church. D Conclusion This survey reveals that demonology took on many different forms within the early Church, but by the time of the medieval era consensus concerning demonological beliefs had emerged from

Weekly at the Lord’s Table

Calvin’s Motives for a Frequent Celebration of the Holy Communion

Series:

Herman Speelman

. Selderhuis (ed.), Calvin Handbook (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans Publishing, 2009), 344–355. Herman A. Speelman, “The Eucharist as a Mysterious Representation of Christ,” in idem, Melanchthon and Calvin on Confession and Communion : Early Modern Protestant Penitential and Eucharistic Piety (Göttingen

Series:

Gert-Jan Roest

nature, man’s place in the universe, and the limits of his real knowledge.” 14 “The faith-reason division of the medieval era and the religion-science division of the early modern era had become one of subject-object, inner-outer, man-world, humanities-science. A new form of the double-truth universe was

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Edited by Koert van Bekkum, Jaap Dekker, Henk R. van den Kamp and Eric Peels

Since ancient times Leviathan and other monsters from the biblical world symbolize the life-threatening powers in nature and history. They represent the dark aspects of human nature and political entities and reveal the supernatural dimensions of evil. Ancient texts and pictures regarding these monsters reflect an environment of polytheism and religious pluralism. Remarkably, however, the biblical writings and post-biblical traditions use these venerated symbols in portraying God as being sovereign over the entire universe, a theme that is also prominent in the reception of these texts in subsequent contexts.
This volume explores this tension and elucidates the theological and cultural meaning of ‘Leviathan’ by studying its ancient Near Eastern background and its attestation in biblical texts, early and rabbinic Judaism, Christian theology, Early Modern art, and film.