Search Results

Kiarie Kamau

The main aim of this paper is to examine the state of publishing in East Africa. It also attempts to review the situation in Malawi and Zambia, where the author has had practical experience in publishing and marketing. The paper focuses on the growth of the publishing industry in the East African region and how this growth has impacted on access to textbooks and trade publications. It demonstrates that there has been significant growth in the industry, especially in Kenya and Uganda. However, this growth has largely been in the area of publishing of textbooks. Funding for the rollout of curricula in the East African countries has been a blessing to publishers because the funding includes allocations for textbook purchases for both primary and secondary schools. However, this kind of publishing has sounded something of a death knell for the publication of general books such as novels and biographies. The paper also demonstrates that indigenous book-publishing firms have gained a stronger foothold in East Africa in the last ten years and edged out the multinationals. It concludes by indicating that unless the publishing model changes, general publishing will continue to be relegated to the back-burner. At the same time, publishers are challenged to embrace digital publishing, since that is where the future of publishing lies.

Series:

Wright

The wealth of excavation of ancient buildings in the past 50 years and the resulting flood of publications has created a demand for a survey of building practice in antiquity. This two-volume work deals with the techniques of setting together the fabric of ancient buildings: the manual and mechanical operations involved; the materials, tools and equipment used. "Ancient" here means from very first beginnings (origins) to the end of Late Antiquity (i.e. about 600 A.D.); as manifested geographically in the Old World of Europe and the Middle East (not sub-Saharan Africa, Further Asia, the Far East or New World). Building (the product and the process) is limited to architectural building and looks at the technology of civil engineering only where it introduces novelties. Technology here means the system of techniques used in the process of building construction rather than the science or theory of building.
The 10 chapters of this first volume are intended to give a general perspective of animal building in the light of evolutionary biology, then of building in the Palaeolithic, Neolithic, Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Levanto-Aegean, Achaemenid, Greek, Roman, Late Antique -Early Christian / Byzantine / Sassanian contexts (with a weighting towards the lesser known prehistoric beginnings and late antique end). The second volume will focus on the technical details: materials of construction, structural systems, principles of construction and forms of construction.

Series:

Mick Wright

This résumé study deals with building material, which together with construction and structures, forms one of the three aspects of building, or equally one of the three factors which constitute the nature of a building. Unlike existing manuals on ancient building, this offers an analytic presentation and the subject matter extends across all ages and regions. The treatment of materials is set out according to a paradigm of nature, manufacture and use, so as to facilitate direct comparison between different modes of the one material, as also between different materials and between different building traditions. This second part is published in two volumes, the first containing texts, the second more than 300 illustrations.

Series:

Wright

Building construction is the subject of this third part of the Ancient Building Technology set (TCH 4 and TCH 7 dealing with the history of building and building materials). Beginning with the formulation of a project (drawings, specifications and estimates of quantities) it goes on to discuss preliminary site surveying and setting out, followed by building site development and its attendant installations, and then examines the disposition of the various building materials (wood, stone, brick, and concrete) in building construction from pre-history to the end of antiquity.
The work is intended as a ready reference compendium of information which otherwise would require extended research to come by. It should be of service to all students of antiquity, and a particular convenience to have on hand during archaeological field work. This volume is published in two parts, the first containing the discussion and the second more than 400 illustrations, completing the discussion.

Henry Chakava

and part-owner of the company he joined in that year, East African Educational Publishers Ltd. Active in many professional bodies, Chakava was Chairman of the Kenya Publishers Association from 1982 to 1992. He has written extensively about publishing in Kenya and Africa. Having worked with British

Henry Chakava

e is today Managing Director and part-owner of the company he joined in that year, East African Educational Publishers Ltd. Active in many professional bodies, Chakava was Chairman of the Kenya Publishers Association from 1982 to 1992. H e has written extensively about publishing in Kenya and Africa

David Hill

East African Educational Publishers pp 187 ISBN 0 937033 58 8 $21.50/£11.95 This book, written by one of Africa’s leading and most respected publish- ers, provides an original and pene- trating insight into the business of publishing and the multifaceted role of the publisher. It offers much more than

Adeche Apeji

Professor Niyi Osundare: “Which publisher in Nigeria talks about packaging the author, organizing literary luncheons, reading within publishing premises, autograph sessions, ‘grounding’ with literary jour- nalists? When news broke ... that the East African Educational Publishers had committed so much of

Michael Wise

origins of library development in Africa and p o i n t up questions and problems posed for the future. Arising out of his P h D thesis, it is a most original work and focuses o n library d e v e l o p m e n t in (mainly) the countries of W e s t and East Africa w h i c h use t h e English language. His a