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442 Book Reviews / Church History and Religious Culture 87 (2007) 365-447 Paul V. Kollman, Th e evangelization of slaves and Catholic origins in East Africa [American Society of Missiology Series 38]. Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY 2005, xxviii + 356 pp. ISBN-13: 9781570756269 (pbk.). £14.99. In Th

In: Church History and Religious Culture

India, whose collapse around 500 was accelerated by invasions of the “Hunas”. 32 In the west, the Sasanian Empire was competing with the Roman Empire across the Afro-Eurasian transition zone from the Caucasus via the Middle East to South Arabia and East Africa, also through proxy wars between

In: Migration Histories of the Medieval Afroeurasian Transition Zone
Author: Thomas F. Glick

noxious odors, which ostensibly caused disease. “Eastern” spices were not necessarily eastern. The most popular spice in medieval Cairo was cinnamon; it came in two varieties, “Chinese” and “Ceylonese”, both of which, however, were imported from east Africa. Cloves were not popular, and even less were

In: Medieval Encounters

describes the East African coasts in such detail » (p. 215). En effet, al-Idrīsī ou Ibn Saʿīd s’y attardent avec profit. En outre, si les toponymes sont ici nombreux, leur positionnement même relatif est incohérent. Au-delà du cap Guardafui, les chercheurs écrivent « the identification of the other

In: Medieval Encounters

Westerners in the Indian Ocean region and (as we shall see below) to the special seafaring skills which such Westerners often possessed. As a result, black slaves from East Africa, and especially Christians from Ethiopia, were probably on the whole much more numerous than any contingent of “Frankish” rowers

In: Medieval Encounters

answering a variety of historical questions. Of perhaps the greatest interest to scholars is “New Light on the East African Theater of the Great War: A Review Essay of the English Language Literature.” The only review essay within the volume, it engages one of the most often studied military actions in

In: International Bibliography of Military History

and weakened the war’s main effort. Other battles and campaigns took place at the German port of Tsingtao in China, in the German colonies of German New Guinea and German Samoa in the southwest Pacific, and in the German African colonies of Togoland, Kamerun, German South West Africa, and German East

In: International Bibliography of Military History
Author: Adam Gaiser

Merchants (Princeton: Markus Wiener, 2003), 3; Savage, “Berbers and Blacks,” 365-366. The reference to the pilgrimage in this passage may be significant: while many slaves came from India and East Africa, slaves from North Africa generally arrived via the Ḥijāz, when the pilgrimage season brought large

In: Medieval Encounters

picked up stories about other regions which he did not himself visit, such as Japan (‘Cipangu’), where the walls and roofs of the ruler’s palace were allegedly covered with gold, or the East African coast. In its scope, consequently, his book had no precedent: in Professor Larner’s words, ‘never before

In: Medieval Encounters
Author: Adam Knobler

Velho, Roteiro , 85-93. Similar reports were written of Christians and Christian-Muslim conflicts along the East African coast, reports which were echoed in royal circles as well as in the writings of mariners. See Velho, Roteiro , 32-33 [10-11 April 1498]. Also see the letter from Mañuel to Fernando

In: Medieval Encounters