Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for :

  • All: "East Africa" x
  • Afro-Asiatic Languages x
Clear All
Author: David Elias
In The Tigre Language of Gindaˁ, Eritrea, David L. Elias documents the dialect of the Tigre language that is spoken in the town of Gindaˁ in eastern Eritrea. While the language of Tigre is spoken by perhaps one million people in Eritrea and Sudan, the population of Gindaˁ is fewer than 50,000 people. Elias describes basic aspects of phonology, morphology, syntax and lexicography. In contrast to other dialects of Tigre, of which approximately a dozen have been identified, Tigre of Gindaˁ exhibits the only recorded examples in Tigre of gender-specific first person possessives, e.g. ʕənye ‘my eye’ (masc) vs. ʕənče ‘my eye’ (masc/fem), and a new form of the negative of the verb of existence, yahallanni ‘there is not’. Contact with Arabic and Tigrinya has resulted in numerous loanwords and a few biforms in Tigre of Gindaˁ.

were to be specified as an affix, one would have to explain why this is the only productive prefix type. Root plus verb compounding is, in contrast, not uncommon in Cushitic. A recurrent process in Cushitic languages and other languages in East Africa is the incorporation of a verb root into a verb ‘to say

In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics
Author: Martin Orwin

response to colonial imposition and also periods of drought and famine. Reese goes on to say: The presence of broad based and highly organized Sufi orders in Muslim East Africa was a fairly recent phenomenon. Sufism was certainly known in the region before that time, but appears to have been

In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics
Author: Alain Kihm

.F. (1962). Colloquial Arabic . London: Hodder & Stoughton. Owens,Jonathan(1977).Aspectsof Nubigrammar.PhDdissertation.London,School of African and Oriental Studies. ——— (1985). The origins of East African Nubi, Anthropological Linguistics 27, 229–271. ——— (1991). Nubi, genetic linguistics, and language

In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics

edition) . Springfield, VA : Dunwoody. Saeed, John I. 1996. Head-marking and pronominal clitics in Somali. In Richard J. Hayward (ed.) Voice and power: the culture of language in north-east Africa, Essays in honour of B.W. Andrzejewski , 37–49. London: SOAS . Saeed, John I. 1999. Somali . Amsterdam

In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics
Three East African Arabic Historical Documents
This work consists of the translation and annotation of three East African Arabic / Swahili manuscripts together with the original texts. They cover aspects of the history of the coast from the early Himyaritic period up to the beginning of the 20th century. By the use of earlier, in some cases hitherto unused Arabic sources, the authors of the texts have contributed to a fuller picture of the East African coastal history. The texts relate directly to works on East African coastal history that have appeared since the latter part of the 19th century. They are presented against the background of general Arabic and Islamic history. The annotations indicate, and some case stress, significant hints and references to matters that need to be borne in mind, along with archeological and other evidences.
The Encyclopedia of Arabic Language and Linguistics is a major multi-volume reference work. It is a unique collaboration of hundreds of scholars from around the world and covers all relevant aspects of the study of Arabic, dealing with all levels of the language (pre-Classical Arabic, Classical Arabic, Modern Standard Arabic, Arabic vernaculars, mixed varieties of Arabic).
Translator: Joep Lameer
The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.
The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.
Author: Steffen Krogh

: Similarities and Differences.” In Language Death. Factual and Theoretical Explorations with Special Reference to East Africa , ed. Matthias Brenzinger . Berlin : Mouton de Gruyter , 59 – 80 . Sasse , Hans-Jürgen . 1992b . “Theory of Language Death.” In Language Death. Factual and

In: Journal of Jewish Languages