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Letters from a Danish Planter in German East Africa 1888-1906
This book provides a rare opportunity to follow the daily life on and around plantations and towns in the first years of the German colonial presence in East Africa, as seen through the eyes of a Danish master farmer working for the German East Africa Company. There are few memoirs and personal letters from these years, and existent letters are primarily by explorers, colonial officials, missionaries or the occasional settler. Lautherborn's material provides one of the very few entry points into the daily business of colonial expansion and consolidation in the early years of German East Africa as seen through the eyes of a practical man trying to do a job in a complex and changing world.
Author: Oliver Coates

recounted the exploits of the R.W.A.F.F. in East Africa, and ‘specific acts of valor by Gold Coast soldiers’ were covered in detail. 64 Prominent women such as Mabel Dove Danquah and Ruby Papafio, journalist and educator respectively, gave broadcast talks urging support for the British, while Prempeh  II

In: Journal of African Military History
Author: Melvin Page

”. 7 Recognizing this potential, a desperate General Jan Smuts in late 1916 contemplated using weaponized gas against German askari during the East African Campaign, but practical considerations prevailed and his idea did not come to fruition. 8 Nonetheless, European accounts of that singularly

In: Journal of African Military History

earlier, cultivated a distinctly South African way of war during the First World War campaigns in German South West Africa and German East Africa where movement became extremely important. This predated the trend towards military mobility that became popular among warfare theorists during the 1920s and

In: Journal of African Military History

areas of concentration—West Africa, East Africa, and the islands of the Indian Ocean. The possibility that West Africa could become a major theatre of war if French North Africa fell into enemy hands, Jackson shows, heightened British strategic attentions in West Africa. He proceeds to examine how the

In: Journal of African Military History

Haile Selassie from the country in 1936 but spurred local irregular resistance until the defeat of the Italians in East Africa in 1941. These particular chapters are fascinating for their explorations of how the evolution of the chewa practice enabled the signal military successes that Ethiopia

In: Journal of African Military History
Author: Lee Cassanelli

happened without Uganda, which was the only country to provide troops during the mission’s first four years and which made that country a target for al-Shabaab’s expanded campaign against East African ‘infidels’ and ‘crusaders’ (43–47, 98–99); and multiple examples of how al-Shabaab’s own tactics continued

In: Journal of African Military History

two protectorates into a single Nigeria, these units were combined as the Nigeria Regiment ( NR ). This unit fought in the Cameroon and East Africa campaigns of the First World War (1914–1918), and the East Africa and Burma campaigns of the Second World War (1939–1945). Within Nigeria, the regiment

In: Journal of African Military History

capital of Windhoek. By the late 1950s, South African foreign policy, force design and operational deployment became more narrowly focused on South West Africa, Rhodesia (Zimbabwe), Portuguese East Africa (Mozambique) and Angola. These deployments occurred in the context South Africa’s Total Strategy

In: Journal of African Military History

. Nairobi: East African Publishing House, 83–118. Emwanu, George. 1967. “The Reception of Alien Rule in Teso.” Uganda Journal , 31.2, 171–182. Falola, Toyin. 2009. Colonialism and Violence in Nigeria . Bloomington, IN : Indiana University Press. Galliéni

In: Journal of African Military History