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Eventually to be completed in six volumes Arabic Literature of Africa will provide a survey of Muslim authors writing in Arabic in Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa and a bibliography of their works. Falling within the tradition of the great works of Brockelmann and Sezgin, it will form a basic reference tool for the study of Arabic writing in areas of the African Islamic world that fall outside the parameters of these works. While primarily a work of reference, it will also attempt to provide an outline of the intellectual history of Muslim societies in the areas it covers: the Nile valley, East Africa and the Horn of Africa, West Africa and the western Sahara, from earliest times to the present.
The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.
The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.

‘and more’ with وزباد ‘and civet,’ based on Wuṣla ii 496, which copies it correctly. Zabād is an aromatic secretion of the perineal gland of the African civet. 65 This was also known as qāt ( Catha edulis ); the leaves are chewed, like betel ( tunbul ). It was brought from Qumr in east Africa

In: Treasure Trove of Benefits and Variety at the Table: A Fourteenth-Century Egyptian Cookbook

: Mother-right Anthropologist of the ‘Vienna School’ in the Cultural Triangle Europe–India–East Africa (BA thesis at Stockholm University, Department of Social Anthropology, 2011). 55 Fischer was temporarily appointed a board member and made a member of the editorial staff of the Moslemische Revue

In: On the Margins

. They are bay-like leaves that are chewed, like betel ( tunbul ). They are brought from Qumr in east Africa (Comoros Islands). In Kanz recipe 654, it is used in an aromatic oil preparation. Most medieval sources are not quite clear on what it is. They know it as a chewed leaf with a pleasant aroma

In: Treasure Trove of Benefits and Variety at the Table: A Fourteenth-Century Egyptian Cookbook

, “Authoritative Scriptures,” 308; Amir Arjomand, The Shadow of God , 43; Amir Arjomand, “The Crisis of the Imamate,” 508–9. 79 See the notes following the Arabic text of the tawqīʿ for some of these references. 80 For example, the East African Khoja Shīʿī scholar Mullah Haji Mohammadjaffer Sheriff Dewji (d

In: Encounters with the Hidden Imam in Early and Pre-Modern Twelver Shīʿī Islam

Shakespeare into his native Tswana language. 3 Plaatje has been extensively studied but he is just one of a generation of black African men of letters. Anglophone West and East Africa—just to stick to the Anglo sphere of colonial rule and education—also have its mission-school educated elites whose work is

In: Philological Encounters