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With the increasing international importance of East Asia in economic, political, and cultural terms, more and more readers are interested in better understanding this part of the world which can boast long-standing histories and traditions as well as vibrating modern cultures. This book series publishes substantial comparative research on the literary and cultural traditions of premodern and modern East Asia and their relation to the world. It welcomes in particular forms of comparative analysis that combine the depth of area-study-expertise and philology with theoretical acumen and a courageous orientation towards fundamental questions.
The series aims to showcase original research on the methodology and practice of comparison in three main areas: intra-Asian comparisons of China, Korea, Japan, and Vietnam; East-West comparisons that examine Western alongside East Asian traditions and explore their historical encounters and cultural interactions; and multi-polar studies that examine East Asian literatures and cultures in light of their relations with India, the Middle East, Africa, or Latin America. The series focuses on the core humanities such as literature, history, religion, philosophy and thought, art history, and archaeology, but also welcomes contributions adopting culturally-informed approaches in anthropology, political science, sociology, or linguistics.
The series is directed at scholars and graduate students of East Asia and, more broadly, comparatists engaged in the study of various literary and cultural traditions around the world. We publish English-language monographs, conference volumes, and, occasionally, English translations of outstanding scholarship in other languages.

The series has published an average of 2,5 volumes per year since 2014.
The concept of friendship is more easily valued than it is described: this volume brings together reflections on its meaning and practice in a variety of social and cultural settings in history and in the present time, focusing on Asia and the Western, Euro-American world.
The extension of the group in which friendship is recognized, and degrees of intimacy (whether or not involving an erotic dimension) and genuine appreciation may vary widely. Friendship may simply include kinship bonds—solidarity being one of its more general characteristics. In various contexts of travelling, migration, and a dearth of offspring, friendship may take over roles of kinship, also in terms of care.

country in East Africa, where the hiv prevalence rate is 5.9 percent; 60 percent of Kenyans who have tested positive for hiv are on arv medications. The Kenyan Ministry of Health reported the nation’s first aids case in 1984, among sex workers, and the following year authorities launched the

In: Global Healing

makes clear the devastating implications of fearing the stigmas surrounding hiv / aids more than being committed to fighting the disease. 11 Aldin Mutembei’s novella, written originally in Swahili for language classes in East Africa, opens in Kagera (northwest Tanzania) at the end of the brutal

In: Global Healing

East African and South Asian Port Polities,” unpublished dissertation (University of Illinois at Chicago, 2008), 30–41. On Sanjan see the series of articles by Ranabir Cakravarti in The Indian Economic and Social History Review (1986, 1990, 1998); Rukshana J. Nanji, Mariner and Merchants: A Study of

In: Mapping the Pāśupata Landscape

Shakespeare into his native Tswana language. 3 Plaatje has been extensively studied but he is just one of a generation of black African men of letters. Anglophone West and East Africa—just to stick to the Anglo sphere of colonial rule and education—also have its mission-school educated elites whose work is

In: Philological Encounters

literature offered new forecasts for relations between Eastern and Western cultures and civilizations. The Silk Road, which dates back to ancient China, is a major transportation hub connecting Asia, East Africa, and Europe. It is also known as “the Canal of Human Civilization” and “the Womb of Global

In: Journal of Chinese Humanities