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This book examines the existing counter-terrorism laws and practices in the six-member East African Community (EAC) as it applies to a range of law enforcement and military activities under various international legal obligations. Dr. Christopher E. Bailey provides a comparative examination of existing national law for EAC countries, including compliance with obligations under international human rights and international humanitarian law, and offers a range of legal reform recommendations. This book addresses two primary, related research questions: To what extent do the current national counter-terrorism laws and practices of the EAC Partner States comply with existing international human rights safeguards? What laws or practices can the EAC adopt to achieve better compliance with human rights safeguards in both civilian and military counter-terrorism operations?

Yoruba (Nigeria), Chineke in Ibo (Nigeria), Nkoo-Bot in Bulu (of Cameroon), Ngewo in Mande (of Sierra Leon), Qamata in Xhosa (South Africa), Ngai in East Africa, etc.’ Samuel Awuah-Kyamekye, Religion and Development: African … ( PDF Download Available) < https

In: African Journal of Legal Studies

the highlands. As previously mentioned, many of the settlers had been inexperienced with regard to farming practices that suited the agro-climatic conditions of Laikipia, and consequently ‘trial and error, sometimes very costly, was the order of the day,’ 82 as the East African Women’s League

In: The Contested Lands of Laikipia

The British East African Protectorate was officially annexed by the British in 1895, and from 1902 a policy of European settlement was advanced under the guidance of Sir Charles Eliot. 23 Over the first two decades of British rule in Kenya, an administrative system evolved in which ownership of

In: The Contested Lands of Laikipia

-Meru intermarriage in his family in another situation. The fluidity of ethnic identities has gradually grown in importance over the past three decades, not only in Laikipia but in East Africa in general. 73 For minorities, one can strengthen the position of one’s group by constructing a movement around a

In: The Contested Lands of Laikipia

Commons . 6 John Galaty, ‘Reasserting the Commons: Pastoral Contestations of Private and State Lands in East Africa,’ International Journal of the Commons 10, no. 2 (30 September 2016), pp. 709–27. 7 Bollig and Lesorogol, ‘The “New Pastoral Commons” of Eastern and Southern Africa

In: The Contested Lands of Laikipia

, Sixty years of colonial rule greatly affected relationships among the groups. Burundi was colonized and absorbed by the German East Africa in 1889, and then administered by the Belgians as the United Nations Organisation Mandate in 1918. The Tutsi received preference during colonial administration

In: Regional Integration in Africa

Community of Central African States ( ceeac – eccas ), the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa ( comesa ), the East African Community ( eac ), the Union du Maghreb Arab – Arab Maghreb Union ( uma – amu ), the Intergovernmental Authority on Development ( igad ), the Community of Sahel Sub

In: Regional Integration in Africa

the North-South Corridor linked to the idea of a continental fta via the sadc -East African Community-Community of East and Southern Africa ( comesa ) trilateral formally launched in 2013. As a formally recognised champion of this corridor, South Africa is responsible for ensuring that this complex

In: Regional Integration in Africa

Community of Central African States ( ceeac – eccas ), the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa ( comesa ), the East African Community ( eac ), the Union du Maghreb Arab – Arab Maghreb Union ( uma – amu ), the Intergovernmental Authority on Development ( igad ), the Community of Sahel Sub

In: Regional Integration in Africa