Search Results

Series:

Edited by Andreea D. Boboc

Theorizing Legal Personhood in Late Medieval England is a collection of eleven essays that explore what might be distinctly medieval and particularly English about legal personhood vis-à-vis the jurisdictional pluralism of late medieval England. Spanning the mid-thirteenth to the mid-sixteenth centuries, the essays in this volume draw on common law, statute law, canon law and natural law in order to investigate emerging and shifting definitions of personhood at the confluence of legal and literary imaginations. These essays contribute new insights into the workings of specific literary texts and provide us with a better grasp of the cultural work of legal argument within the histories of ethics, of the self, and of Eurocentrism.
Contributors are Valerie Allen, Candace Barrington, Conrad van Dijk, Toy Fung Tung, Helen Hickey, Andrew Hope, Jana Mathews, Anthony Musson, Eve Salisbury, Jamie Taylor and R.F. Yeager.

Series:

Jennifer M. Neighbors

binary categories of premodern and modern law. After a period of infatuation with Weber’s modernizing project early in the Reform era, Chinese intellectuals have, in recent years, begun to turn away from Weber, finding fault with his Eurocentrism and his use of late nineteenth-century continental legal

Series:

Ignacio de la Rasilla del Moral

challenge in a globalizing and multi-polar international legal order, 22 triggers bloody intellectual debates between international legal theorists and historians regarding Eurocentrism, the imperial genealogy of international law, and the extent to which Vitoria’s work may have seen as the early precursor

Series:

Ignacio de la Rasilla del Moral

Eurocentrism of the profession, was, however, needed for the Institute to begin to function at its inaugural meeting held in Washington in 1915. Indeed, Brown Scott had to appease the raised eyebrows of some members of the Institute of International Law when he, and Alejandro Alvarez, who had just published