Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 9 of 9 items for :

  • All: "Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī" x
  • Archaeology, Art & Architecture x
Clear All

This article discusses the illumination of two manuscripts produced in Konya in 677 (1278)—a pocket Qurʾan 1 and a monumental copy of Jalal al-Din Rumi’s Mas̱navī-i maʿnavī 2 (The Spiritual Couplets, hereafter Mas̱navī )—along with several other manuscripts that I propose were also produced

In: Muqarnas Online

in Anatolia. These include a merchant Sharaf al-Din al-Hindi, a contemporary of the Konya-based Sufi mystic Jalal al-Din Rumi (d. 1273), who went back and forth to India bringing back merchandise that was strange and wondrous ( gharīb va ʿajīb ). 65 Contacts between north India and Anatolia appear

In: Muqarnas Online

on folio 1r, and folio 205v has a prayer or a eulogy for “ Abu’l-Fatḥ Ibrāhīm Ṣulṭān .” 22 
 Ibrahim Sultan commissioned unillustrated volumes as well. Among these are a Masnavī-i maʿnavī of Jalal al-Din Rumi dated 822 (1419–20), 23 a Jāmiʿ al-ṣaḥīḥ dated 832 (1428–29), 24 and a Dīvān of Amir

In: Muqarnas Online

concepts was certainly indirect. The list of books which he is reported to have studied includes works by Ghazali and Jalal al-Din Rumi, both of whom were much concerned with the relation of outward appearance and inner essence, a topic central to the theory of portraiture. 28 Thus as a preliminary meas

In: Muqarnas Online

-rubā ) or fortress of Z āt al-Ṣuvar . They ignore his advice and fall in love with the images of the Faghfur’s daughter. Z āt al-Ṣuvar , or Dizh-i Hushrubā , is the last narration in the Ma s navī of Rūmī. See Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī, The Ma s navī of Rūmī, ed. Reynold Alleyne Nicholson, 8 vols

In: Muqarnas Online

‚hn‚ma of 1589–90, which is known to have been owned by a member of the Safavid royal family, does not mention a patron’s name. 108 A manuscript of the Masnav” of Jalal al-Din Rumi dated 1011 (1603), which was probably produced in Ottoman Baghdad, provides additional evidence that members of the Zu

In: Muqarnas Online

Aflaki’s mid–fourteenth-century hagiographical text based on the oral and written records of Jalal al-Din Rumi, a famous poet and theologian of the preceding century, mentions that Rumi employed one Greek architect to build a chimney for his house and another to pave his terrace. In a different incident

In: Muqarnas Online

Chinese painters. For different versions of the competition between Greek and Chinese painters in Nizami, al-Ghazali ( Iḥyāʾ ʿulūm al-dīn ), and Mawlana Jalal al-Din Rumi (d. 1273), see Soucek, “Nizami on Painters and Painting,” 13–14. In the version of Rumi, who wrote in Anatolia (Rum), it is the Rumi

In: Muqarnas Online

, from a volume of Saʿdi, see Sotheby & Co., Catalogue of Valuable Persian and Indian Manuscripts and Miniatures , London, July 19, 1935, lot 35 (source shared by Robert Skelton in 2009). The story of a mystic who tamed a lion and used a snake as a whip also appears in the Maṣnavī of Jalal al-Din Rumi

In: Muqarnas Online