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these objectives through a broad approach to maslaha (a maslaha is an act that safeguards the primary objectives, or maqasid , of the Lawgiver) as a means to legitimize the prohibited. They also encourage searching within the four schools of law and beyond them to find the most lenient answer. 6

In: Journal of Muslims in Europe

attended an Islamic religious school, Jamʿiyyat al-Maqāṣid al-Khayriyya al-Islāmiyya (al-Maqāṣid Charitable Islamic College), and later Kulliyyat Fārūq al-Sharʿiyya (Fārūq College of Islamic Canon Law...

In: Encyclopaedia of Islam Three Online
Islamic Legal Thought and Muslim Women in Western Europe
In How Muftis Think Lena Larsen explores fatwas that respond to questions asked by Muslim women in Western Europe in recent decades. The questions show women to be torn between two opposing notions of morality and norms: one stressing women’s duties and obedience, and one stressing women’s rights and equality before the law. Focusing on muftis who see “the time and place” as important considerations in fatwa-giving, and seek to develop a local European Islamic jurisprudence on these increasingly controversial issues, Larsen examines how they deal with women’s dilemmas. Careful not to suggest easy answers or happy endings, her discussion still holds out hope that European societies and Muslim minorities can recognize shared moral concerns.

. Three of the five basic values of religious law (maqāṣid al-sharīʿa)—reason (ʿaql), life (nafs), and progeny (nasab)—are strongly related to the body. Relevant opinions can be found in the legal manuals...

In: Encyclopaedia of Islam Three Online

then from four tools used to uncover new resources in the law: qiyas (analogy), maslahah (public good), maqasid (purposes of the law), and ijtihad (exercise of personal reason). 1. Qur’an and Sunna as Environmental Texts Some essays in Islamic environmental texts are almost as much Qur’anic quotation

In: Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology

, the present and future state of the biosphere is given legal primacy. Ecology is theorized to be at the core of the very “aims of the law” (Ar. maqasid al-shariʿa ) as an antecedent. That is, environmental well-being is claimed to supersede and to represent a necessary condition that precedes the

In: Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology

?hpid=sec-religion . Johnston David L. 2007 . “ Maqasid al-Shari‘a : Epistemology and Hermeneutics of Muslim Theologies of Human Rights .” Die Welt des Islams 47 , 2 : 149 – 187 . —— . 2010 . Earth, Empire and Sacred Text: Muslims and Christians as Trustees of Creation . London : Equinox . Llewellyn Othman Abd

In: Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology

2.320). David himself makes a similar argument in his philosophical-ethical treatise, Tajrīd al-ḥaqāʾiq al-naẓrīya wa-talkhīṣ al-maqāṣid al-nafsānīya (Distillation of Theoretical Truths and Summary of Spiritual Goals) (MS Huntington 489:89a). There, David argues that Muslim Sufis call themselves

In: Numen

āmiyya at Baghdad 1092–1095 Philosophical Phase Maqāsid al-falāsifa ; Tahāfut al-falāsifa ; Mih ̣ akk al-naz ̣ ar ; Mīzān al- ʿ Amal 1095 Spiritual crisis 1095–1105 Seclusion according to Munqidh , writing of Ihyā ʾ Ih ̣ yā ʾ ʿ ulūm al-dīn 1105–1109 Mystical and Neoplatonic writings Mishkāt al

In: Numen