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Author: Manfred Stanley

generalizations. Each area and situation has its own dynamics and potentialities. It is best to resort to a major example of the problems raised here. There is little doubt that adaptational issues were partly involved in the often misunderstood Mau Mau Emergency in Kenya during the 1950's. The official report2

In: International Journal of Comparative Sociology

available information indicates that similar systems of "justice" against collaborators were utilized by other underground groups under similar conditions. Hence, this type of system was utilized by the French resistance during World War II (the Maquis) and by the Kenyan Kikuyu Mau Mau. One con- servative

In: International Journal of Comparative Sociology

Railway reach Kampala in 1901 but in 1924 (from Port Bell) and in 1931 (from Jinj a) . A great deal of space is devoted to Mau Mau (somehow linked to an un- documented change from matrilineal to a patrilineal system), to missions and slavery. Nearly 20 pages are taken up with an aimless rambling on

In: International Journal of Comparative Sociology

come down in the camp of liberal-conservative scholarship. For example, military coups are regarded as a technique of conscious "revolutionary" change. There are dozens of places where one could challenge the interpretation of facts, or the "facts" themselves. The Mau Mau revolt hardly qualifies as an

In: International Journal of Comparative Sociology