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Mau Mau in Harlem? The U.S. and the Liberation of Kenya is a well-documented study, in which Gerald Horne examines the role that individual Americans, African American organizations, British government and trade unions, and the United States government played in the liberation of Kenya. It is a

In: African and Asian Studies

engendered (219–220), on the ecosytemic consequences of China’s massive landfilling, and its mau-mau “cabbage tactic”. In the Epilogue, the author appraises readers of the immediate post- PCA ruling period. It narrates a stunning sequel to the PCA verdict as the then newly-installed Duterte

In: Philippine Political Science Journal

tao taw tau tau *tau ha ka ka ka kaa ka *ka cai cho' cheu saii saw chaeu cai * � eti pao pau plao o pao plaw ptaou plau yi nhi ngi yi i ngi gnien ni *nl –. mao mau mao mao mau maou mau *mau si si shi hsi si chi si *sl .j sai , so' , sheu hsaii siu seu sai *sai o \ xana sanga shinga hsinga singa sa

In: T'oung Pao

target of African resentment (like at the time of the Mau-Mau in Kenya). Nehru chose to support the East African drive for independence without giving much consideration to the fate of the local Indians whom he advised to align themselves with African nationalism, which some of them did, without much

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

as anti-colonial movement, the Mau Mau movement. This movement started as a Kikuyu land struggle movement against the British land tenure practices of land grab but the movement was captured by the people who elevated it at the national movement level both in its content, its strategies and its

In: African and Asian Studies

international arena. Until Al-Qaeda committed its outrages in the United States and Western Europe, all global North-South battles were fought on global Southern soil. The Mau Mau war in Kenya devastated the country in the 1950s – but all the killings on both sides were perpetrated on Kenyan soil (Maloba

In: African and Asian Studies

: East African Publishing House, 1975); Maina Kinyatti, Mau Mau: A Revolution Betrayed , Nairobi/ New York and London: Mau Mau Research Centre & Vita Books, 1992); Oginga Odinga, Not Yet Uhuru (Nairobi/ Kampala and Dar es Salaam: East African Educational Publishers Ltd., 1967); Ojwando C. Abuor, White

In: African and Asian Studies

– Kikuyu, Luo, Luhya, Kamba and Kalenjin- account for 70%. Of these, the Kikuyu, who were most actively involved in the independence and Mau Mau movements, are disproportionately represented in public life, government, business and the professions. The Luo people are primarily merchants and artisans. The

In: African and Asian Studies

African religions, opening avenues for recasting them as religious movements critiquing the social order (1, 90). One can document such significant movement cultures from the initial encounters with European colonialism. The Mau Mau and Maji Maji movements were anchored in religious idioms and rituals

In: African and Asian Studies