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clusters are smaller than syllables, the SSP is not reduced to a mere tendency (Keydana, 2012: 103). However, Keydana has formulated his analysis in Optimality Theory ( OT ), a major tenet of which is that all constraints are potentially violable, therefore violations of the SSP are predicted to be

In: Indo-European Linguistics

assumption that CL is all about mora conservation (cf. Hayes 1989 and several others) — their deletion should not induce lengthening. Second, CL is an instance of opacity, and opacity is the single biggest conundrum that Optimality Theory faces. This paper addresses both issues and suggests that CL should

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics
In Reconciling Indo-European Syllabification, Adam Cooper brings together two seemingly disparate phenomena associated with Indo-European syllable structure: the heterosyllabic treatment of medial consonant clusters, which tolerates CVC syllables, and the right-hand vocalization of sonorants, which ostensibly avoids them. Operating from a perspective that is simultaneously empirical, theoretical, and historical in nature, he establishes their compatibility by crafting a formal analysis that integrates them into a single picture of the reconstructed system.

More generally, drawing on evidence from Vedic, Greek, and Proto-Indo-European itself, Cooper demonstrates the continued relevance of the ancient Indo-European languages to contemporary linguistic theory, and, moreover, reaffirms the value of the syllable as a unit of phonology, necessary for these languages’ formal representation.
In: Stressing the past

Optimality Theory ( OT ; Prince and Smolensky 1993/2004). The basic gemination pattern is analyzed in 4.3.1; I then proceed in 4.3.2 to the exceptional non-gemination of pre-stop voiceless stops and show that it can be neatly captured in OT as a blocking effect. 4.3.1 Deriving gemination of voiceless

In: Indo-European Linguistics

generalizations about—as well as in their reconstructed common ancestor, Proto-Anatolian ( PA ). Second, to develop synchronic analyses, framed in terms of Optimality Theory (Prince and Smolensky, 1993/2004), of the phonological systems that generate these patterns. Third, to

In: Indo-European Linguistics

promising account for Wackernagel’s observation within a grammar can be given in a framework developed in Alderete (2001). His system is able to address inversion and can—in principle—cope with the fact that internal derivation is not restricted to o -stems. Working in optimality theory, Alderete

In: Indo-European Linguistics

lexical interface systems, surface accentual patterns are determined by a complex interplay between morphology and phonology, including default phonological principles like ADA . Such morphophonological interactions are ideally suited for implementation in Optimality Theory ( OT ) (Prince and Smolensky

In: Indo-European Linguistics

idýll-ic, Miltón-ic, titán-ic etc.; he handles this in a constraint-based approach, appealing to a high ranking of faithfulness in the phonology (more specifically of metrical faithfulness in the stem-level constraint hierarchy countenanced in his framework, Stratal Optimality Theory

In: Indo-European Linguistics

. Aschehoug & Co. Byrd, Andrew Miles (2015). The Indo-European Syllable . Leiden & Boston: Brill. Cho, Young-mee Yu & Tracy Holloway King (2003). Semisyllables and universal syllabification. In Caroline Féry & Ruben van der Vijver (eds.), The Syllable in Optimality Theory , 183

In: Indo-European Linguistics