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ChristineD. Worobec

Sergei I. Zhuk. R u s s i a ' s Lost Reformation: Peasants, Millennialism, a n d R a d i c a l Sects in Southern Russia a n d Ukraine, 1830-1917. Washington, DC: W o o d r o w Wilson Center Press; Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004. xx, 457 pp. $60.00. The historiography of the Russian

Michaeł Giedroyć

to more recent analyses of this pro- cess: there is only one short sentence in it on the subject of the Eastern (Orthodox) Church (p. 33)! Chapter 4 (the arrival and the departure of the Reformation) is extremely selective in the sense that it concentrates on only two major influences: those of

John V.A. Fine

Carl McMillan Carleton University Z d e n k o Ziatar. O u r Kingdom C o m e : The Counter-Reformation, the Republic o f Dubrovnik, a n d the L i b e r a t i o n o f the B a l k a n Slavs. Boulder, CO: East European M o n o g r a p h s , 1992. xxi, 464 pp. $42.00. Distributed by C o l u m b i a

Jakub Zejmis

-seventeenth century, and exacerbated the splitting of ethnic Belarusians along religious-cultural lines. These' conflicts ended the cultural synthesis that Sahanovich contends had taken place under the impact of the Reformation, whereby Rus' ethnicity had expanded to include not only Orthodox but Protestants, Uniates

Elise Kimerling Wirtschafter

the spirit of Russian Enlightenment, they could not conceive of progress separately from the harmonious interlocking universe of the moderate mainstream and religious Enlightenments or without attention to moral reformation and spiritual regeneration. In eighteenth and early nineteenth-century Russia

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Waldemar Kowalski

In the second half of the sixteenth century, Scottish immigrants to Little Poland became a visible ethnic minority in numerous towns of that province and particularly in its capital, Cracow. This is the first study to examine this urbanized immigration in the period until the 1660s, when Poland–Lithuania, devastated by the mid-century Swedish invasion, was no longer an attractive migrant destination. From around the 1570s, affluent Scottish merchants developed intense commercial relations in central Europe, while peddlers of that nationality distributed so-called ‘Scotch goods’ at local markets.
The majority of Scots participated in the life of local Evangelical congregations and suffered religious persecutions together with their co-religionists. This prompted their collaboration with the Swedish occupants against their Catholic neighbors.

Carl McMillan

s . New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991. xv, 318 pp. $44.50. Carl McMillan Carleton University Z d e n k o Ziatar. O u r Kingdom C o m e : The Counter-Reformation, the Republic o f Dubrovnik, a n d the L i b e r a t i o n o f the B a l k a n Slavs. Boulder, CO: East European M o n o g r a