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present the temporal concepts of permanence and endurance. I do argue that increased conceptualization in the Babylonian Talmud, especially in the editorial layer, increases frequency of metaphoric applications of קבע. But rabbis using this root from the tannaitic period onward seem to have been

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2006 JJTP 14,1–2 1 Muki Tsur and Avraham Shapira, “With Gershom Scholem: An Interview,” trans. Moshe Kohn, Gerschom Scholem, On Jews and Judaism in Crisis , ed. Werner J. Dannahuser (New York: Schocken, 1976), 31–32. IS THERE A WARRANT FOR LEVINAS’S TALMUDIC

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

CONTENTS Articles Hanoch Ben Pazi ...................................................................... 1 Rebuilding the Feminine in Levinas’s Talmudic Reading Joshua Parens .............................................................................. 33 Maimonidean Ethics Revisited

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

establishes an intriguing connection between idolatry and ontology. This connection is aptly illustrated by the biblical character of Balaam, the ambiguous Mesopotamian prophet or sorcerer of Numbers 22–24, who is almost never men- tioned in Levinas’s work but who is present, albeit hidden, in the talmudic

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

; hermeneutics; sampling; anomalous monism; technology; Talmud Theirs was a system that made a virtue of ambivalence and built uncertainty into bedrock assertions of faith. No wonder fundamental- ists and fascists have hated it so. – Jonathan Rosen, The Talmud and the Internet 1 Introduction For the ancient

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

simultaneously the subject of the narrative—that is, the diegesis, or universe, in which the story takes place—and an object within this universe. This study explores the mise en abyme as a key to the phenomenology of the five scriptures—the book of Torah included—to which the talmudic sages have ascribed

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

contains appropriate violence by framing the institu- tions of the court. Levinas then appears in his repeated citation of a Talmudic text about the judge not facing the defendant in a court. Through a careful reading of the Talmudic text and the Biblical texts upon which it draws, we can see Levinas

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

at the stones of pure marble, do not say 'Water, Water' for it is said, 'The speaker of lies shall not be established before my eyes.''' (BabylonianTalmud Hagigah 14b) With this terse warning, the Talmud enlightened and terrified the intrepid Jewish mystics of its day. For those brave individuals who

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

us. We have the Bei! ha-Bebira to thirty-six Talmudic or Mishnaic tractates, and we also know that Me'iri wrote a companion vol- ume of novellae to those same tractates. This paper, then, will merely scratch the surface. 3 But what a surface it is! Me'iri was not only self-conscious as to both method

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

, and to observe their new variations in the Pseudepigrapha and Midrash. The anthology of mythic theoma- chies preserved the Babylonian Talmud (b. Baba Bathra 74a-b) is a striking case in point. 2 Assorted details now known from ancient U garit resurface in this literary source long after their eclipse

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy