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© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2012 JJTP 20.1 Also available online – brill.nl/jjtp DOI: 10.1163/147728512X629790 WHO THINKS IN THE TALMUD? Sergey Dolgopolski University at Buffalo, SUNY Abstract This article traces a historical shift, and in particular its erasure from memory on the intellectual

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

relationship between memory and sacred space in the wake of exile, though the descriptions of the pilgrimage festivals in the talmudic passages read more like fantasy than memory, far from an objective or historical account. In the rabbis’ own terms, however, the stories of the ark are fashioned as memory

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

quoted in any Jewish source prior to that period. 4 Nevertheless, one early rabbinic source that does not quote from SY may indicate an awareness of its existence. This is a tale from the Babylonian Talmud about two sages, R. Ḥanina and R. Osha‘ya, who created a calf by using hilkhot yetzirah (laws of

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

:1–11). 82 It is not surprising, therefore, that Talmudic sages like Ḥoni ha-Me‘agel (the circle-drawer) are often described as disputing with God or protesting presumed divine injustice. 83 Talmudic sages, roughly speaking, adhere to this hermeneutical perspective, declaring themselves loyal heirs of

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

, Bland circumvents the interruption of the “modern” in order to retrieve and mobilize the value of “imagination.” We may see an analogous movement at work in “Who Thinks in the Talmud?” by Sergey Dolgopolski. Drawing on the work of de Libera and Foucault, Dolgopolski is interested in elaborating

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

death, includes commentaries on the Torah and other biblical books, collections of talmudic novellae and exegesis of early rabbinic works, a dream journal and mystical autobiography, a sustained commentary on the Zohar, and a mysterious code of Jewish laws and practices that pertain to everyday life and

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

:26; 10:28–30, 40). In the Mishnah we find the expression mil ˜ emet reshut , i.e., a vol- untary or approved war. 10 This is further elaborated in the Talmud, where we find that only a tribunal of seventy-one sages may approve such a voluntary war against another people, whereas mil ˜ amah le- x Adonay

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

in mediaeval thought, which the philosophers and theo- logians of the time endeavored to reduce to a monism or a unity. . . . Philo in Alexandria and Maimonides in Fostat were the products not of the Bible and Talmud alone, but a combination of Hebraism and Hellenism, pure in the case of Philo, mixed

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

philosophical tradition. He also attributes this perspective to the most formidable sources in the Jewish tradition when he claims that Maimonides and the talmudic rabbis recognize that the universe is eternal, and they must attempt to work around the biblical account of creation, as opposed to Aristotle, who

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy

but unable to find the palace); (4) Talmud as well as logic and math ( just outside the palace gate but unable to enter); (5) natural science (inside the antechambers of the palace); and (6) divine science- prophecy (into the inner court). It is a path in the opposite direction of the one taken by the

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy