Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • All: "Thomas Hobbes" x
  • Children's Rights x
Clear All

important element in Roman law.5 In the history of philosophy the doctrine of patria potestas has been entertained and supported. Thomas Hobbes held that children are subject to the 'natural dominion' of their parents, and no different in status from servants.6 Sir Robert Filmer defended the God-given power

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights

- rent rights discourse remains imbued with old philosophies (see Federle I 14). The child of Thomas Hobbes’s Leviathan (1651) is parental property to be used or sold, outside the law, incapable of consent to the social compact and therefore incapable of right or wrong. Echoing Roman doctrine, by his day

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights

meeting support oblig- ations. This is quite like the Hobbesian view, "[h]e which giveth sustenance to another, whereby to strengthen him, hath received a promise of obedience in consideration thereof." Thomas Hobbes (1982) De Corpore Politico pt. II, ch. 4, §3, in Jeffrey Blustein, Parents and Children

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights

evil. Thomas Hobbes ( 1651 ) Leviathan, 73 (Richard Tuck, ed., Cambridge Univ. Press 1991). "Over ... children ... there is no Law, ... because they had never power to make any covenant, or to understand the consequences thereof; and consequently never took upon them to authorise the actions of any

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights