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This article argues that adaptation to a disaster event is determined and facilitated by formal institutions, such as local government units and humanitarian agencies. In extreme events like Super Typhoon Haiyan, these institutions are supposed to provide knowledge and resources to enable the survivors to build their capacity to adapt to the devastation and prepare for future risks. This article examines how women, being one of the poorest and most vulnerable sectors, were able to cope with the devastation of Haiyan. Qualitative interviews were conducted with women survivors in the “Tent City” and in two transitional shelters/bunkhouses in Tacloban City. Results suggest that in both the emergency and early rehabilitation phases, formal institutions conducted themselves poorly and demonstrated inadequate inclusiveness and sensitivity to the needs of the survivors. The low compliance with and implementation of RA 10121 (Disaster Risk Reduction Law) by the local government unit of Tacloban, and the insufficient engagement by humanitarian agencies with the survivors, contributed to the difficult adaptation situation for survivors in Tacloban City. Threats associated with physical security and privacy were downplayed or ignored. Women instead had to adapt to their situation in various ways.

In: Philippine Political Science Journal
Author: David Holm

‘logograms’, a term that serves to indicate that the unit of writing with its square shape represents a ‘word’, that is an individual morpheme or unit of meaning. Adapting a logogram to write another morpheme can take place either through P, phonetic adaptation, or S, semantic adaptation. In plain language

In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities
Author: Li Kuang-Ti

© Brill, Leiden 2002 JEAA 3, 1–2 PREHISTORIC MARINE FISHING ADAPTATION IN SOUTHERN TAIWAN BY LI KUANG-TI 李匡悌 (Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica) Abstract This paper discusses prehistoric fishing activities as seen through archaeological remains from the area of Eluanbi in

In: Journal of East Asian Archaeology
Author: Tsang Cheng-Hwa

© Brill, Leiden 2002 JEAA 3, 1–2 MARITIME ADAPTATIONS IN PREHISTORIC SOUTHEAST CHINA: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PROBLEM OF AUSTRONESIAN EXPANSION BY TSANG CHENG-HWA 臧振華 (National Museum of Prehistory, Taidong, Taiwan) Abstract The movement of the Austronesian peoples from their homelands in the

In: Journal of East Asian Archaeology
Author: June McDaniel

This article discusses the challenges of adaptation for Indonesian religion. It describes the ways that the major Indonesian religions have changed to fit the requirements of being recognized religions, and focuses as an example on the ways that Balinese Hinduism has changed to become Agama Hindu Dharma Indonesia. It also examines the traditional theological problem of “faith and works” in the Indonesian context, and the concerns used to balance modernization and religious freedom.

In: Wacana

Modernist and integrationist theories tend to see the process of nation building as a “game” of surviving. However, the idea of a “surviving” nation, which is shaped according to the logic of the game of politics as domination, is antithetical to the organic processes of institution building consistent with the habitus of the diverse social formations which are found in the Philippines. In these organic spaces, a unified community is born not out of an idea of a subordinated “other” being eliminated, but of “others” being accommodated in the larger society. Survival is not an individualistic and Darwinian process of weeding out the weak, but as a communitarian invitation towards a shared meaning system that is drawn from positions of difference, in which the other is not subordinated, but is just different, and in which the idea of sovereignty is not colonizing the sense of autonomy of these different subjectivities. This theoretical argument will be supported by how the Philippine adaptation of the Survivor franchise, through the first season of the reality TV program Survivor Philippines, has effectively confronted the western construct inherent in the very idea of the game, as seen on how it is played in its American versions. How the game was played, crafted and interpreted in its Filipino version has challenged the Machiavellian concept of politics, and the Darwinian idea of survival of the fittest. This is done by depicting the process of building communities from the fragments of multiple identities as one in which the politics of conflict and contestation is resolved not towards elimination and assimilation of the defeated weaker “other,” but of accommodation and tolerance of those who are just different.

In: Philippine Political Science Journal

This article is a further discussion of previous research which is a pilot project to observe patterns of cultural interaction within the Chinese community in Indonesia as a part of a project to understand the phenomenon of the multicultural society during the New Order Era. The specific target of this research is to study the socio-cultural interactions within the Chinese community in Manado during the Reform Era (2000-2014). This research aims to study the strategic adaptation of the Chinese in Manado, by analysing the obstacles and opportunities in their socio-cultural interaction with the locals. Using data from field research and literature studies, this qualitative research applies an ethnographic approach by observing various actions in their socio-cultural interactions.

In: Wacana
Author: Ian Proudfoot
It has been said that "a modern arrogance has blocked our access to the history of the Muslim calendar in Southeast Asia". Without at least the outlines of that history, we simply do not understand the basis of dates found in Malay sources. Also, without a history of Malay calendars we are denied an understanding of the context from which the Javanese Muslim calendar arose.
This volume, the result of combining empirical evidence with a sound understanding of the structural requirements of calendar-making, and of the mechanisms through which these needs could be met, for the first time explains how these old octaval calendars actually worked. It traces the history of Muslim calendars in Southeast Asia, and attempts to put them into their historical and cultural context. Understanding the old calendars will at last throw light on a number of essential aspects of older Malay science and culture.
An accompanying interactive CD-ROM presents the reader with a tool for converting Malay and Javanese dates, with access to the range of variant calendars.
Author: Wiriya Inphen

preferred by literary readers and accepted by reviewers and critics in Anglo-American society. Domesticating translation, in Outi Paloposki’s (2011 , 40) sense, refers to adaptations of foreign cultural words/items to fit the target culture. On the other hand, foreignizing translation refers to the ways

In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities

to accept each other” and “adaptation on the basis of the differences” may lead to sustainable social development through local wisdom and global change in a holistic way. The assumption of this study may be a guideline for people of different faiths to live together in unity amidst the diversity of

In: Manusya: Journal of Humanities