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The Complexities of Water Disaster Adaptation

Evidence from Quang Binh Province, Vietnam

Mogens Buch-Hansen, Luu Bich Ngoc, Man Quang Huy and Tran Ngoc Anh

management, as well as societal capacity for mitigation and adaptation. The relationships between climate-related hazards (such as typhoons, flooding, rising sea levels, changing seasonality, droughts, etc.), human-induced environmental changes (such as deforestation, dyke construction, river embankments

Is Local Community the Answer?

The Role of “Local Knowledge” and “Community” for Disaster Prevention and Climate Adaptation in Central Vietnam

Ole Bruun and Mette Fog Olwig

Introduction Several streams of literature on disaster risk reduction ( DRR ) and climate change adaptation ( CCA ) point almost routinely to the potential of “local communities” in protecting the interests of local inhabitants in the face of external stress. The notion of community

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Shūhei Hosokawa

Translator Paul Warham

of Japanese migrants to Brazil, terms commonly used in cultural contact theory—reception, adaptation, accommodation, borrowing, compromise, and blending—have gained little purchase. Instead, assimilation was generally seen as a process of becoming familiar with the Brazilian environment—or rather (in

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Shūhei Hosokawa

Translator Paul Warham

because it was originally a loan. 28 Corn/maize itself is an interesting case of borrowing/adaptation in English. Maize is a borrowing from a Central American language, despite the whiff of European “foreignness” it seems to have acquired for Anglophone Americans. The Japanese counterpart, tōmorokoshi

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Shūhei Hosokawa

Translator Paul Warham

gestures and modes of speech. Just as school sports days evolved by incorporating elements of modern military training into the traditions of existing local festivals, these oratorical meetings were an adaptation of contemporary Western-style speech contests, built on the traditional art of storytelling

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Shūhei Hosokawa

Translator Paul Warham

/ shitawasiku / saredo ikyō no / kono chi o aisu 汝が語る祖国のことも慕わしくされど異 郷のこの地を愛す The old country you speak of / I am fond of it too / but I love the land / 
of this foreign country (all 17) These four verses show a four-stage process of adaptation by which immigrants moved from attachment to Japan, to loss of the

Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation in Metro Manila

Challenging Governance and Human Security Needs of Urban Poor Communities

Emma Porio

and community health and well-being and, in some cases, to survival (ultimate security challenge).” Studies on climate change vulnerability and adaptation, therefore, provide a rich opportunity to define security threats to urban poor communities and their environments. Meanwhile, Redclift (2009

Keng We Koh

documents is the story of Mandailing migration in the nineteenth century, especially in the context of the Padri War in western and central Sumatra, and their adaptation to new environments in the peninsula, through tin-mining and through trade. The roles of Sutan Puasa and his contemporaries, like Raja

East-West Identities

Globalization, Localization, and Hybridization

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Edited by Kwok-bun Chan

Under the simultaneous influences of globalization and localization, there has emerged a prevalent social formation based on a hybridized culture in which the cultural norms are many and various: boundary transcendence, alternative cultures, cultural hybridity, cultural creativity, connectivity, tolerance, multiculturalism, cosmopolitanism. While the economic forces shaping globalization are powerful and seemingly getting stronger, they are not immutable, nor are their effects predictable or necessarily overwhelming. Contributors to this book are optimistic that the socio-cultural formations of the future, such as cultural hybridity and cosmopolitanism, will be a viable option for constructing new or renewed global communities of migrants around the world. It is on these diasporic communities that the self-definition (the self-identity) and cultural expansion of all migrants depend, and it is with these tools that migrants are best equipped to navigate the raging torrents of globalization in the new millennium of a post-postmodern era. Globalization brings with it a fear, a sense of loss and demise. It also brings with it a new sense of opportunity and hope. It is in this spirit that this book should be read.

Contributors: Chan Kwok-bun, Jan W. Walls, David Hayward, Michael E. DeGolyer, Lam Wai-man, Georgette Wang, Emilie Yeh Yueh-yu, Lu Fang, Nan M. Sussman, Rie Ito, Oscar Bulaong Jr., Brian Chan Hok-shing, Millie Creighton, Anthony Y.H. Fung, Ho Wai-chung, Chiou Syuan-Yuan, Chris Wood, Chung Ling, Steve Fore, Todd Joseph Miles Holden, Ashley Tellis, Jeffrey S. Wilkinson, Steven McClung