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In: The Provo International Conference on the Dead Sea Scrolls
A New Text and Translation with Introduction and Special Treatment of Columns 13-17
Author: Daniel Machiela
The so-called Genesis Apocryphon (1Q20) from Qumran Cave 1 has suffered from decades of neglect, due in large part to its poor state of preservation. As part of a resurgent scholarly interest in the Apocryphon, and its prominent position among the Aramaic Dead Sea Scrolls, this volume presents a fresh transcription, translation, and exstenive textual notes drawing on close study of the original manuscript, all available photographs, and previous publications. In addition, a detailed analysis of columns 13-15 and their relation to the oft-cited parallel in the Book of Jubilees reveals a number of ways in which the two works differ, thereby highlighting several distinctive features of the Genesis Apocryphon. The result is a reliable text edition and a fuller understanding of the message conveyed by this fragmentary but fascinating retelling of Genesis.
Author: Susan Docherty

carefully evaluates the author’s possible means of access to Scripture, which include Greek and Hebrew manuscripts, his memory, his own Greek translation of a Hebrew text, excerpt collections, and early Christian combinations and adaptations of selected passages. Allen’s conclusion is that John was familiar

In: Dead Sea Discoveries

continuation of some of the trajectories seen in the composition history of the books of the Minor Prophets themselves, as well as a move towards particular sectarian adaptations. Although Hagedorn and Tzoref perceive no real gap between inner-biblical and Qumranic exegesis, the pesharim stand separate from

In: Dead Sea Discoveries
Author: Esther Chazon

the types of prayer used at Qumran, traces their development from and adaptation of biblical models, and outlines similarities with rabbinic forms and practices. This approach suits the author's purpose: to "examine the prayer and poetry of the people of Qumran in conjunction with...Jewish prayer and

In: Dead Sea Discoveries
Author: Jutta Jokiranta

includes tracing the development and growth of these metaphors (1–3). The interest is on the reuse of scriptural ideas in the Scrolls and later writings without making strong differentiations between the kinds of reworkings and adaptations found in the documents. Swarup states that he uses the concept “Dead

In: Dead Sea Discoveries
Author: Aryeh Amihay

law. Since this route is blocked for those dealing with divine law, later legislators require alleged interpretation for its adaptation, resulting in palpable inconsistencies. While the epistemic claim is that there are no inconsistencies, their factual existence forcefully indicates their difference

In: Dead Sea Discoveries
Author: Marieke Dhont

law. The following two contributions are particularly interesting from a methodological viewpoint. Gregory Sterling, in “The School of Moses in Alexandria: An Attempt to Reconstruct the School of Philo,” and Sean Adams, in “Philo’s Questions and the Adaptation of Greek Philosophical Curriculum,” deal

In: Dead Sea Discoveries

-called Messianic Apocalypse with its adaptation of Isaiah 35 and 61 that is echoed in Luke 7:22, 4Q500 fragment 1 with its hints of matters which are also echoed in the parable of the vineyard, and 4Q246 with its use of the titles "son of God" and "son of the Most High" (cf. Luke 1:32-35). Vermes has entitled his

In: Dead Sea Discoveries

features which Tov connects to QSP, and which were not yet mentioned in the second edition. Because of the discussions about the QSP, Tov has added a new section on consistency and statistical analysis. However, the subsection “Contextual Adaptations” (“the scribes of the texts written in the QSP often

In: Dead Sea Discoveries