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integrated into his own thought. Because Hutner was a leader of the Lithuanian-Orthodox community, his published discourses are free of explicit references to sources outside this group’s accepted canon. However, as scholars have noted, concealed within his writings are themes and adaptations of ideas that

In: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy
Author: Emanuel Tov

layer of sectarian revisions. The pre-Samaritan texts differed slightly from one another, while sharing some central editorial and textual phenomena: segments in Exodus 7–11 as well as sections in Exodus and Numbers that were duplicated from parallel passages in Deuteronomy 1–3, grammatical adaptations

In: Tempel, Lehrhaus, Synagoge
Author: Hans Ausloos

( epikaleô ) as a translation equivalent: “II se peut (…) que la LXX traduise par adaptation, en explicitant ce que veut dire, pour les fidèles, que Dieu demeure dans le Temple: on peut l’y invoquer, avoir recours à luí. Faute de témoins assurés, on ne peut pas dire que la LXX lisait un passif du

In: Tempel, Lehrhaus, Synagoge

, of course, that the source texts of Samuel and Moses were not the same: Samuel translated the Arabic adaptation of the Aristotelian text, and Moses Ibn Tibbon rendered Averroes’s Epitome on it. This circumstance, however, cannot account for the aforementioned differences, for the stock terminology

In: Studies in the Formation of Medieval Hebrew Philosophical Terminology
Author: Raphael Jospe

with the dis- cussion, elaboration, adaptation, qualiŽ cation, or criticism of these views by Jewish thinkers.” 11 Second, the external in uences are not only important for an understanding of their “repercussions” in Jewish thought. At least some of the time they are essential for determining the

In: Review of Rabbinic Judaism
Author: Jacob Neusner

, his modes of thought and expression, even the lan- guage he spoke and the clothes that he wore. That represents his up bringing and education from 1907 to 1940. The simple outline tells the story of a man whose adaptations to challenge required remarkable courage. He started within what was culturally

In: Review of Rabbinic Judaism
Author: Jacob Neusner

,” “adaptation” and “accommodation,” “the degree of Hellenization,” “Jewish recep- tivity to foreign in uences,” and other category-formations of learning that presup- pose a vast interpretative structure. Levine’s basic view is stated as follows: “. . . in each and every case studied, we have taken pains to

In: Review of Rabbinic Judaism
Author: Shai Afsai

Franklin’s famous books with the name ‘Cheshbon ha-Nefesh’… R.M.L. was first among Hebrew authors to turn his attention to Franklin’s books. He provided a translation-adaptation of The Way to Wealth (Poor Richard’s Almanack).” 68 Franklin’s direct influence on Cheshbon ha-Nefesh —and his indirect

In: Review of Rabbinic Judaism

. Maimonides regards creation out of nothing as the foundation of the Torah. Nevertheless, he bases his proof for the existence, one- ness, and incorporeality of God on an adaptation of Aristotle’s argu- ments, which entail the eternity of the world, in which he does not believe. This is because he does not

In: Review of Rabbinic Judaism

illuminating. He makes stick his claim that “Canadian Jewish history is a subject in its own right, not a branch or pale re ection of the Jewish experience in the United States. . . . The Americanization of the Jews—their gradual or rapid adaptation to and acceptance in the mainstream of American cul- ture

In: Review of Rabbinic Judaism