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Author: Elena Nendza

der Ratsherr und Dichter Barthold Heinrich Brockes vermag mit seiner deutsch-italienischen Übersetzung das ‘niederländische Gedankengut’ aus dem geistlichen Epos im frühen 18. Jahrhundert der Hansestadt Hamburg richtig freizusetzen. Marinos epische Kindermord-Adaptation avanciert in der europäischen

In: Daphnis
Author: Maciej Mikuła
In this volume, Maciej Mikuła analyses the extant texts of the Ius municipale Magdeburgense, the most important collection of Magdeburg Law in late medieval Poland. He discusses the different translation traditions of the collection; the application of Magdeburg Law in different cities; how differences between the versions could affect the application of the rights; and how the invention of printing influenced the principle of legal certainty. Mikuła ultimately shows that the differences between the texts not only influenced legal practice, but also bear out how complex the process was of the adaptation of Magdeburg Law.
Author: Lynne Tatlock

translation, and a distant adaptation, namely, Antonio de Eslava’s Noches de Invierno (Pamplona/Barcelona 1609); Matthäus Drummer von Pabenpach’s German translation of it, Noches de Invierno, Winternächt (Vienna 1649); and Johann Beer’s Zendorii a Zendoriis Teutsche Winternächte (Nuremberg 1682). In so

In: Daphnis
Author: Oehme Annegret

. What might seem like an insignificant difference is in fact of major importance. This change of emphasis alters the entire narrative intention of the text and underscores the adaptation’s dramatic repurposing of the source material. Indeed, it is not simply that the Magelene ends by focusing on a

In: Daphnis

that the adaptations found in this copy are also Van der Noot's work. They consist in: (1) The lifting from the preliminaries of the (unsigned) fos. A2-A3 (the ode by which Het Bosken is dedicated to William Parr, Earl of Northampton) and the insertion of these two leaves after quire G; in this way

In: Quaerendo

Abstract

Dutch painters, is considered to be a model of renaissance prose-writing. It has been preserved in two editions (1604 and 1618), the first of which was printed during Van Mander's life-time. Nevertheless, due to its greater readability the second edition has long been preferred. Recent research has focussed on the 1604 edition for textual matters; its printing history, however, has not yet generally been appreciated. It is the aim of the present article to study the typographical features of the Schilder-Boeck and to compare these with other books, produced by the same printer Jacob de Meester at Alkmaar. For this purpose, 11 copies of the Schilder-Boeck have been examined along with 20 items originating from the same press. Little attention is paid to the contents of the Schilder-Boeck, as this has already been done in previous bibliographical descriptions. The collational formula reveals some adaptations for the sake of updating and correction. Running-titles occur on every page,

In: Quaerendo

printers' handbook. Dingler, he writes,6 had a specimen of the handpress invented by the American Hagar sent from New York and a good adaptation could be expected 2 See especially James Moran, Printing Presses, history and development from the fifteenth cen- tury to modern times (London 1973), chapters 3

In: Quaerendo
Author: B.A. Vermaseren

undergone some revision; this device, too, turns out to be an adaptation, with minor changes, from a work which had then only recently been published. In August 1984 De Gulden Passer published, as vols. 58-60 issued for the years 1980-2, a reproduction of the Emblemata by the Hungarian Johannes Sambucus

In: Quaerendo

traditae amoenissi- mum viridarium by Arnoldus Freytag (Emmerich, c . 1560 - 1605 ), 1 a humanist and physi- cian who was appointed professor of Medicine at the University of Helmstedt (Germany) in 1589 . This emblem book is in fact an adaptation, and translation into Latin, of the French translation/adaptation

In: Quaerendo
Author: D. Grosheide

recognita et multo accuratius, erratis omnibus editionis primae sublatis, cmendata. [vignette] Coloniae Agrippinae, Excudebat Nicolaus Bohmbargen, MDLXXVIII. This edition of Horace's Ars Poetica is more of an adaptation than a text edition. The questions which arise from this fact, however, require

In: Quaerendo