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Author: Sandra Toffolo

changes had begun to take place. Research on the perception of the industrial side of Venice in the sixteenth century could shed more light on the adaptation of images of Venice to the developments in industry. As always, the dissemination of an image in representations interacted closely with the

In: Describing the City, Describing the State

) has highlighted in considering the transatlantic exchanges, there is always a “processes of adaptation, tinkering, and mobilization of outside resources for local purposes.” Postcolonial and decolonial approaches also inspired research based on transits and communications. Postcolonialism could be a

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Map History
Author: Sandra Toffolo

previously existing views of Venice into consideration, and could incorporate parts of those views, they did not simply take them over entirely or without adaptations. The processes by which contemporaries constructed narratives of the newly formed Venetian state are an individual and vital constituent of

In: Describing the City, Describing the State
East-West Collaboration in the Mapping of Qing China (c. 1685-1735)
Author: Mario Cams
In Companions in Geography Mario Cams revisits the early 18th century mapping of Qing China, without doubt one of the largest cartographic endeavours of the early modern world. Commonly seen as a Jesuit initiative, the project appears here as the result of a convergence of interests among the French Academy of Sciences, the Jesuit order, and the Kangxi emperor (r. 1661-1722). These connections inspired the gradual integration of European and East Asian scientific practices and led to a period of intense land surveying, executed by large teams of Qing officials and European missionaries. The resulting maps and atlases, all widely circulated across Eurasia, remained the most authoritative cartographic representations of continental East Asia for over a century.

This book is based on Dr. Mario Cams' dissertation, which has been awarded the "2017 DHST Prize for Young Scholars" from the International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Division of History of Science and Technology (IUHPST/DHST).
Author: Nadja Danilenko

Arabic Kalīla wa-Dimna , made its way to the Abbasid court through a translation from Middle Persian by Ibn al-Muqaffaʿ (d. ca. 756). Not only did the Arabic version become popular in the Islamicate world, but it also served as the basis for adaptations in 40 languages until the nineteenth century

In: Picturing the Islamicate World
Author: Nadja Danilenko

several translations and adaptations. When presenting the world as a reflection of God’s wisdom, al-Qazwīnī first addressed the heavenly spheres, including angels, and then turned to earthly spheres, including humans and djinn. 22 As discussed in the last chapter, the Wonders of Creation held various

In: Picturing the Islamicate World
Author: Nadja Danilenko

introduction to the translation survived in the most famous Book of Kings by Firdawsī. 9 Among the poetry flourishing in the tenth century, Firdawsī’s Shāhnāma ( Book of Kings ) influenced Persian literature and inspired various adaptations. Building on verses by Daqīqī (fl. tenth c.), Firdawsī set out

In: Picturing the Islamicate World