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Leadership Group (C40) and Connecting Delta Cities (CDC), “New Orleans is in need of a transformative vision and process for water management.” The same group declared Rotterdam “the perfect showcase for climate change adaptation.” 21 Rotterdam, in the Rhine-Meuse-Scheldt delta in the Netherlands, with

In: Mediterranean Rivers in Global Perspective
Author: Terje Tvedt

adapted to them and controlled them, river-society relations form an unusual fruitful platform for comparative and contrastive research. This is so, especially because issues of river adaptation and river control bring into focus all the seminal questions of historical scholarship. The history of

In: Mediterranean Rivers in Global Perspective
Author: Jana Flieshart

children, a University of Stirling graduate, is the author of this article. Furthermore, the remaining children were very interested in the BAOR and British culture in general. This would indicate that the workers by their adaptation and adoption of mutual norms and values constructed a bridge between the

In: Briten in Westfalen 1945-2017

survive in the steppes those who were drawn to them imitated lifeways of Tatars. Such adaptations combined with the use of gunpowder weaponry brought about a transformation of Turkic qazaqlïq into a powerful game-changing institution that turned the tables not only on the Tatars, but also on the

In: Mediterranean Rivers in Global Perspective

debate about phantom borders see von Hirschhausen et al. 2015. 16 See, e.g., Ritter 1822, 516–822 and his still noteworthy and in fact monographic reflections on the Nile. 17 Kapp 1868. 18 Ratzel 1882/1891; Ratzel 1897. 19 See, for example, the adaptation of Kapp in

In: Mediterranean Rivers in Global Perspective

Puerto Rico, 1833–1874 (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press); R. Scott (1985) Explaining abolition: contradiction, adaptation and challenge in Cuban slave society. In: M. M. Fraginals, F. M. Pons and S. L. Engerman (eds) Between Slavery and Free Labor: The Spanish-Speaking Caribbean in the

In: Critical Readings on Global Slavery
Author: Youval Rotman

toward a Christian civilization, and that evolution was accompanied by an internal adaptation. 102 I have emphasized the relation between the status of a free person and a Christian identity. Khosrow’s discourse cited by Menander Protector shows how the international and even political perspective of

In: Critical Readings on Global Slavery

recognized that Palmares was based on a number of traditional African forms of political and social organization, although like most fugitive communities it combined these with aspects of European culture and specifically local adaptations. 65 Palmares was not a single community but a number of mocambos

In: Critical Readings on Global Slavery
Author: Keith Hopkins

, composite work incorporating many different stories told about slaves, and attached here to Aesop. But we can have little or no idea about the audience at whom it was aimed, or by whom it was read or heard. Its survival in Egypt and the occasional adaptation of the text to Egyptian conditions should not

In: Critical Readings on Global Slavery
Author: Michael Zeuske

, 1300–1589 (Cambridge [etc.], 2011). 83 Angela Bartens, Der kreolische Raum: Geschichte und Gegenwart (Helsinki, 1996). 84 Jane G. Landers, “Cimarron Ethnicity and Cultural Adaptation in the Spanish Domains of the Circum-Caribbean, 1503–1763”, in Lovejoy, Identity in the Shadow of

In: Critical Readings on Global Slavery