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Verse Recitation: A Review,” QURANICA, International Journal of Quranic Research , 1(1), (2011): 39-50. 6 S.-A. Selouani and Y.A. Alotaibi, “Adaptation of Foreign Accented Speakers in Native Arabic asr Systems,” Applied Computing and Informatics , 9(1), (2011): 1-10. 7 R.A. Haraty, and O. El

In: Al-Bayan: Journal of Qur'an and Hadith Studies
Author: Omar Nakib

conditioning and the adaptation of vital human energy is not to uproot it but to transform it into an efficient social energy that contributes positively towards the actualization of society’s cultural ideals; that is, to build civilization. 32 Hence, the role of religion as a regulative psychological force

In: Al-Bayan: Journal of Qur'an and Hadith Studies

Society Publications, Series II, No.74, 1934), xli. 22 This represents an adaptation of H.M. Federspiel, Popular Indonesian literature of the Qur’an (Ithaca: Cornell Modern Indonesia Project, Southeast Asia Program, 1994), 58. 23 C. Guillot & L. Kalus, “La stèle funéraire de Hamzah Fansuri

In: Al-Bayan: Journal of Qur'an and Hadith Studies
Author: Hamza M. Zafer

was characterized by an “evolving repertoire of ritual, doctrinal and mythical possibilities” and involved the “exploration, innovation, adaptation, adjustment and assimilation” 1 of pre-existing religious customs and practices. This chapter explores how the ecumenical community implied by the term

In: Ecumenical Community
Author: Hamza M. Zafer

adaptations and interpretations of Biblical narrative. Through the hermeneutics of typology, the Qurʾanic depiction of Abraham as a clan traitor reflects the expectations of the proto-Muslim believer. As Neuwirth explains, at every stage of its development, the Qurʾan’s communitarian rhetoric binds “its

In: Ecumenical Community
In Religious Stories in Transformation: Conflict, Revision and Reception, the editors present a collection of essays that reveal both the many similarities and the poignant differences between ancient myths in Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and modern secular culture and how these stories were incorporated and adapted over time. This rich multidisciplinary research demonstrates not only how stories in different religions and cultures are interesting in their own right, but also that the process of transformation in particular deserves scholarly interest. It is through the changes in the stories that the particular identity of each religion comes to the fore most strikingly.

ǧāhilīya respectively). One adaptation that I apply to Izutsu’s method of semantic fields involves the use of secular poetic sources for the study of the Qurʾān. This leads to the problem of the generic difference, sometimes incompatibility, between scripture and ancient Arabic poetry and its effect on

In: The Semantics of Qurʾanic Language: al-Āḫira

function of the eschatological Garden; the allegory is in part an adaptation of that of the Garden of Eden: ‘deprivation’ takes the place of ‘banishment’, the ‘owners’ the place of the ‘first couple’ and the ‘social sin’ replaces the ‘original sin’. The Qurʾān’s interpretation/adaptation of the Biblical

In: The Semantics of Qurʾanic Language: al-Āḫira

-Ḥasan ʿAlī b. ʿĪsā ar-Rummānī, Abū Sulaymān Ḥamd b. Muḥammad al-Khaṭṭābī (319–388/931–998), and ʿAbd al-Qāhir al-Jurjānī, are all both quite early and important. Another classical Arabic rhetorical work, albeit a later one, which is now available in an abridged English adaptation is Pierre Cachia’s The Arch

In: The Inimitable Qurʾān