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th century, it must be suitable as it is one’s duty to adapt it to our real life.” 14 A key part of this adaptation was creating religious art that supported church dogma but also spoke in a visual language appropriate to the modern age. The Catholic crisis of modernity coincided chronologically

In: Byzantium in Dialogue with the Mediterranean

τζουμ!! , 1972), and the philosophical allegory The Process ( Διαδικασία , 1976). There is also a film adaptation of Aristophanes’s Lysistrata (1972). 3 The other two versions of Dafnis and Chloe are Laskos’s remake of his own movie in 1969 and Mika Zaharopoulou’s 1966 version, which sets the

In: Byzantium in Dialogue with the Mediterranean

ius commune literature is interpreted, adapted and applied in the Netherlandish contexts. The quality of legal education, as well as the political and economic contexts are of course very important for a successful reception and adaptation: this study wants to (help to) demonstrate the ‘informational

In: Loans and Credit in Consilia and Decisiones in the Low Countries (c. 1500-1680)

between two different kinds of changes to that rate. Fluctuations could be motivated either by a (normal) adaptation to the deterioration of the intrinsic quality of one of the real coins through its normal use, or by a mere (and according to Hostiensis often fraudulent) change of the official rate. In

In: Loans and Credit in Consilia and Decisiones in the Low Countries (c. 1500-1680)

of decisiones – In a similar way as for the German consilia literature, Gehrke also distinguished – based on his study of the German early modern decisiones literature – several types of published volumes. 208 This distinction (with some adaptations to our regional context) can again be

In: Loans and Credit in Consilia and Decisiones in the Low Countries (c. 1500-1680)

, students could turn to Samuel von Pufendorf’s De jure naturae et gentium (1672) and finally to Hugo Grotius’s De jure belli ac pacis (1625). Concerning Grotius, Kemmerich also recommends the textbook adaptations by Caspar Ziegler, Johann Georg Kulpis and Philipp Reinhard Vitriarius. To make things as

In: The Law of Nations and Natural Law 1625-1800

from the implications of the external guarantee (see below), there was also some criticism among writers, of various legal and intellectual traditions, of the supposed opacity of many aspects of the treaties, although some believed that was deliberate, in order to facilitate adaptations to conditions

In: The Law of Nations and Natural Law 1625-1800