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Western Crime Fiction Goes East

The Russian Pinkerton Craze 1907-1934

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Boris Dralyuk

This book examines the staggering popularity of early-twentieth-century Russian detective serials. Traditionally maligned as “Pinkertonovshchina,” these appropriations of American and British detective stories featuring Nat Pinkerton, Nick Carter, Sherlock Holmes, Ethel King, and scores of other sleuths swept the Russian reading market in successive waves between 1907 and 1917, and famously experienced a “red” resurgence in the 1920s under the aegis of Nikolai Bukharin. The book presents the first holistic view of “Pinkertonovshchina” as a phenomenon, and produces a working model of cross-cultural appropriation and reception. The “red Pinkerton” emerges as a vital “missing link” between pre- and post-Revolutionary popular literature, and marks the fitful start of a decades-long negotiation between the regime, the author, and the reading masses.

Bronwyn Naylor

the law courts of Victoria. Crime and Punishment has been seen as significant and relevant since its publication. At least 30 movies and adaptations have been made, the first in 1909. On his arrival in Russia in 2013, Edward Snowden was presented with a copy by his lawyer as a guide to