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, the creation of the communal cultural content, and their adaptation to the framework of social life and members’ social ideas. At the end of the 1920s and in the early 1930s, many kibbutzim began a process of creating communal holidays. These holidays were celebrated on the same dates as the

In: The Metamorphosis of the Kibbutz
Authors: Yuval Dror and Yona Prital

work became marginalised and minimised – and has often disappeared completely ( Dror 2004c ). Educating for work was adversely affected by the evolution of kibbutz education. Kibbutz education gradually lost its uniqueness and was modified through adaptation to the programmes of state education

In: The Metamorphosis of the Kibbutz

.N., Hart, S.D., Gregor (eds) Information Systems Foundations: Constructing and Criticising . Canberra : anu Press , 125 – 142 . Yami , T. and Samuel , Y. ( 2004 ). Schools in the transition from a competitive economic model: a model of adaptation to a changing

In: The Metamorphosis of the Kibbutz

developments have led to diversification in the types of inhabitants that currently compose the social fabric and have caused differences in rights and obligations. 1 These developments clearly reflect modes of adaptation by the kibbutz and the society to globalisation and the neoliberal

In: The Metamorphosis of the Kibbutz

Adapt to New Environments Organizations’ adaptation to environment is a universal phenomenon; otherwise, they cannot continue to exist. For an organization such as the Central Committee in which power is heavily centralized and which was arranged according to an ideology of class struggle, such

In: The China Nonprofit Review
Author: Tao Chuanjin

802 820 Messick David M. “Individual Adaptations and Structural Change as Solutions to Social Dilemmas” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 1983 44 294 309 Olson Mancur The Logic of Collective Action 1965 Cambridge, MA Harvard

In: The China Nonprofit Review
Authors: Chen Xiufeng and Li Li

continuous adaptation to the surrounding social environment. Although the establishment of the organization is the result of human actions, the evolution of the organization is beyond the control of human will. Neither are the interests and wishes of the organization fi xed; they are also a process of

In: The China Nonprofit Review
Authors: Cheng Pei and Kristen Parris

society. 10 Despite ongoing debate, civil society became a common way to refer to associational life in China, often with adaptations for the distinctive Chinese context until it was effectively banned by the CCP in 2013. 11 Even the term NGO has not been officially embraced, even as non

In: The China Nonprofit Review

Organizations: Funding Strategies and Patterns of Adaptation,” ed. Y. Hasenfeld, Human Services as Complex Organizations (New Park, CA: Sage, 1992): 73-97. ——, Understanding Nonprofit Funding (San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 1993). Hannan, M. T., and Freeman, J., “The Population Ecology of Organizations,” AJS

In: The China Nonprofit Review
Authors: Xue Zhang and Tian Gan

Grandovit’s research, some scholars believe that embeddedness is an exchange logic that shapes motivation and promotes coordination and adaptation. The unique feature of this logic is that it shifts the motivation of actors from narrow pursuit of direct economic profits to enriching relationships through

In: The China Nonprofit Review