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traducteur, ou se contente-t-il de reprendre des traductions déjà réalisées ? On pourrait à la rigueur imaginer qu’ il ait pu se procurer l’ adaptation en français du l’  Historia scolastica que Guiard des Moulins, chanoine de Saint-Pierre d’ Aire-sur-la-Lys, acheva en 1294 sous le titre de Bible

In: The Medieval Chronicle 13
Author: Marzia Caporale

In 2012 , Belgian author Amélie Nothomb published a novel entitled Barbe bleue ( Bluebeard ), a modern-day adaptation of Charles Perrault’s 1697 folk tale about a wealthy and hideous nobleman who murders his wives as punishment for entering his secret chamber. Nothomb’s fascination with folk

In: Transgression(s) in Twenty-First-Century Women's Writing in French
Author: Antonia Wimbush

solidarité humaine: An Interview .’ Australian Journal for French Studies 55 ( 3 ), 246 – 258 . 1 In January 2019, Tadjo published the children’s book Le Voyage de Yao , a literary adaptation of the film Yao (2019), directed by Philippe Godeau and starring actor and comedian Omar Sy, thereby

In: Transgression(s) in Twenty-First-Century Women's Writing in French

’Aube edition published simultaneously in France. In Bey’s 2015 demystification of this legendary female figure the author also signals the rich tradition of adaptations of the popular romance in a range of genres throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries through the citation of two of its most popular

In: Transgression(s) in Twenty-First-Century Women's Writing in French

chaînes. […] Je régresse. […] La faculté d’adaptation de la femelle humaine est un miracle de la nature. C’est à ce jour la seule espèce qui sait muter en quinze jours de prédateur à invertébré. MSP 44–6 In Epistmology of the Closet , Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick explains how ‘gender […] is the far more

In: Transgression(s) in Twenty-First-Century Women's Writing in French

semantisch aufgeladenen Inszenierungen des Essens zu (vgl. dies. [Anm. 32]). Eine der Halben Birne sehr ähnliche Motivkonstruktion findet sich in Konrads Konrad von Würzburg Engelhart als Adaptation der verbreiteten Freundschaftslegende Amicus und Amilius , in der ein Apfel als Freundschaftsprobe

In: Unverfügbares Verinnerlichen
Empowerment as a concept is making its impact on the field of literary studies. This volume shows its intricate relation to contemporary fiction in English, applying a broad range of approaches such as feminist, transcultural, and intersectional studies. Dealing with genres as diverse as dystopia, science fiction, TV adaptations, the historical novel, and immigrant fiction, this collection offers the first in-depth study of empowerment in literature. How, and to which end, do texts endow characters with power? In which ways can fiction become a tool of authorial self-empowerment? And which effects do such narratives have on readers? With this book, empowerment is put on the map of literary studies as a new, highly relevant critical concept stimulating fresh perspectives on contemporary fiction. Contributors: Sarah Dillon, Paul Hamann-Rose, Britta Maria Colligs, Peter Childs, Eva-Maria Windberger, David Malcolm, Ralf Hertel, Eleanor Ty, Diana Thiesen.
Approaches to Translation Studies is an international series promoting the scholarly study of translation. The notion of plural ‘approaches’ to translation and its study calls up images of scholarly explorers following untrodden paths to translation, or more cautiously (re)tracing the familiar routes. Either way, it indicates a refusal to be tied to dogma or prejudice, a curiosity about possible new vistas, and an awareness that the observer’s view depends on where s/he comes from. But a recognition of the plurality of possible approaches does not necessarily mean passive acquiescence to relativism and scepticism. The idea of ‘approaching’ translation also implies a sense of purpose and direction.

In the context of today’s globalised and pluralised world, this metaphorically suggested perspective is perhaps more relevant than ever before. The series therefore remains fully committed to it, while trying to respond to the rapid changes of our digital age. Ready to travel between genres, media and technologies, willing to span centuries and continents, and always keeping an open mind about the various oppositions that have too often needlessly divided researchers (e.g. high culture versus popular culture, linguistics versus literary studies versus cultural studies, translation ‘proper’ versus ‘adaptation’), the series Approaches to Translation Studies will continue to accommodate all translation-oriented books that match high-quality scholarship with an equal concern for reader-friendly communication.

Approaches to Translation Studies is open to a wide range of scholarly publications in the field of Translation Studies (monographs, collective volumes…). Dissertations are welcome but will obviously need to be thoroughly adapted to their new function and readership. Conference proceedings and collections of articles will only be considered if they show strong thematic unity and tight editorial control. For practical reasons, the series intends to continue its tradition of publishing English-language research. While students, teachers and scholars in the various schools and branches of Translation Studies make up its primary readership, the series also aims to promote a dialogue with readers and authors from various neighbouring disciplines.

Approaches to Translation Studies was launched in 1970 by James S Holmes (1924-1986), who was also one of the ‘founding fathers’ of Translation Studies as an academic discipline. At later stages the series’ editorship passed into the hands of Raymond van den Broeck, Kitty M. van Leuven-Zwart and Ton Naaijkens. Being the very first international series specifically catering for the needs of the fledgling discipline in the 1970s, Approaches to Translation Studies has played a significant historical role in providing it with a much needed platform as well as giving it greater visibility in the academic marketplace.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

Volumes 2, 4, and 5 were published by Van Gorcum (Assen, The Netherlands), but orders should be directed to Brill | Rodopi.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Approaches to Translation Studies is an international series promoting the scholarly study of translation. The notion of plural ‘approaches’ to translation and its study calls up images of scholarly explorers following untrodden paths to translation, or more cautiously (re)tracing the familiar routes. Either way, it indicates a refusal to be tied to dogma or prejudice, a curiosity about possible new vistas, and an awareness that the observer’s view depends on where s/he comes from. But a recognition of the plurality of possible approaches does not necessarily mean passive acquiescence to relativism and scepticism. The idea of ‘approaching’ translation also implies a sense of purpose and direction.

In the context of today’s globalised and pluralised world, this metaphorically suggested perspective is perhaps more relevant than ever before. The series therefore remains fully committed to it, while trying to respond to the rapid changes of our digital age. Ready to travel between genres, media and technologies, willing to span centuries and continents, and always keeping an open mind about the various oppositions that have too often needlessly divided researchers (e.g. high culture versus popular culture, linguistics versus literary studies versus cultural studies, translation ‘proper’ versus ‘adaptation’), the series Approaches to Translation Studies will continue to accommodate all translation-oriented books that match high-quality scholarship with an equal concern for reader-friendly communication.

Approaches to Translation Studies is open to a wide range of scholarly publications in the field of Translation Studies (monographs, collective volumes…). Dissertations are welcome but will obviously need to be thoroughly adapted to their new function and readership. Conference proceedings and collections of articles will only be considered if they show strong thematic unity and tight editorial control. For practical reasons, the series intends to continue its tradition of publishing English-language research. While students, teachers and scholars in the various schools and branches of Translation Studies make up its primary readership, the series also aims to promote a dialogue with readers and authors from various neighbouring disciplines.

Approaches to Translation Studies was launched in 1970 by James S Holmes (1924-1986), who was also one of the ‘founding fathers’ of Translation Studies as an academic discipline. At later stages the series’ editorship passed into the hands of Raymond van den Broeck, Kitty M. van Leuven-Zwart and Ton Naaijkens. Being the very first international series specifically catering for the needs of the fledgling discipline in the 1970s, Approaches to Translation Studies has played a significant historical role in providing it with a much needed platform as well as giving it greater visibility in the academic marketplace.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

Volumes 2, 4, and 5 were published by Van Gorcum (Assen, The Netherlands), but orders should be directed to Brill | Rodopi.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Author: Wendy Wheeler

cultural change also) are likely to generate a reorganization of the sign relations of organismic selves. Very obviously, were it not for organisms’ biosemiotic receptivity (a flexibility unknown to any kind of machine), no such evolutionary adaptation would be possible. As Ilya Prigogine wrote in his

In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory