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This book is a comprehensive study of the Germanic loanwords in Proto-Slavic. It includes an investigation of all Germanic words that were borrowed into Proto-Slavic until its disintegration in the early ninth century. Research into the phonology, morphology and semantics of the loanwords serves as the basis of an investigation into the Germanic donor languages of the individual loanwords. The loanwords can be shown to be mainly of Gothic, High German and Low German origin. One of the aims of the present study is to clarify the accentuation of Germanic loanwords in Proto-Slavic and to explain how they were adapted to the Proto-Slavic accentual system. This volume is of special interest to scholars and students of Slavic and Germanic historical linguistics, contact linguistics and Slavic accentology.

more near-front and near-back” (2012:42). 19 It is attractive to think that the imbalances of the Yukaghir vowel system and vowel harmony reflect the adaptation of an original system with front rounded * ü and * ö to a system very similar to that seen in Yeniseian, Pre-Proto-Samoyedic and Pre

In: Indo-European Linguistics

and growing range of languages, dialects, and varieties—63 to date (March 2014). A constantly updated list can be found on the CDI website (http://www.sci.sdsu.edu/cdi/adaptations_ol.htm). However, the majority of these adaptations are designed for monolingual children, in a single language

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

suggests that the SSP is now highly ranked. 3 For example, Spanish and Portuguese allow complex onsets only if there are no SSP violations. Violations of the SSP in initial position are repaired through epenthesis, a process which must be synchronically active since it occurs in both loan adaptation

In: Indo-European Linguistics

-European inherited declension class related to the type of Vedic sákhā ‘friend’ (acc. sg. sákhāyam ), rather than the result of a foreign adaptation (Schwyzer 1939: 479; Chantraine 1933: 115). In Greek this category has the same formal characteristics as diphthongal stems, that is, its endings underwent the fall

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

points out that word classes such as noun, verb, etc. were purpose-built concepts, as “a natural” and “brilliant response” “to the problems posed by a language of a particular type” (this language being Ancient Greek, with some minor adaptations from Classical Latin) (p. 77). PoS, noun, etc. all go back

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

bulk of the Greek dialects are attested from the Archaic and Classical periods, ca. the eighth through the third centuries BCE , from the adaptation of the Greek alphabet to the spread of the koiné during the Hellenistic period. They are found across the Mediterranean, from southern Italy and Sicily

In: Indo-European Linguistics

phonetic value of the Luwian laryngeals, Simon gives a convenient table in which all values of the renderings of these consonants in neighbouring languages are given (Simon 2014: 886). A part of this table is reproduced here (with minor adaptations

In: Indo-European Linguistics

Processing , 131–154. Hillsdale, NJ : Erlbaum. Shatskov, Andrew. 2006. Some remarks on Hittite infix verbs of the type h̬arni(n)k -. Altorientalische Forschungen 33(2).286–292. Svensson, Ann-Marie and Jürgen Hering. 2009. On the English and German Adaptation of French Loans in the Germanic

In: Indo-European Linguistics

between the former and the definite adjectives is clearly systematic. The forms of the pronominal inflection are indeed regular from the perspective of sound change (allowing, of course, for some minor analogical adaptations from the nominal system). It is thus reasonable to claim that the inflectional

In: Indo-European Linguistics