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] subordinate (3). [If] dukes and kings can hold on to it, the ten thousand things will bin 宾 [guest, to comply] of their own accord (4). Heaven and earth [will] interact to drop sweet dew. The people cannot order it and it will self-balance (5). [As] zhi 制 [manufacture, process, carve] begins, there are

In: The Annotated Critical Laozi

which have] not enough in order to enrich [that which, those who] have surplus.” The regulatory laws of nature are not like this; they take from what is abundant and use it to compensate what is not sufficient, and thereby maintain a principle of balancing according to the mean. The rules and laws of

In: The Annotated Critical Laozi

[ Discourses Weighed in the Balance ] has “堯何等力?”.

In: The Annotated Critical Laozi

shi 施 [to carry out, scattered] means to follow an irregular course.’ According to Ding Gongzhu 丁公著 (d. 826), it should be pronounced the same way as yi 迤 [winding, walk off a path]. In the chapter Qi su 齐俗 [ Balancing Customs ] of the Huainanzi 淮南子 [ Writings of Master Huainan ] it says

In: The Annotated Critical Laozi

is utmost jing 精 [essence, semen, seminal energy]. [It] screams all day but does not get sha 嗄 [hoarse]” in Chapter 55 describe the vigor and balance of an infant’s vital energy. In the context of the present chapter however, infancy refers to a horizon which can only be attained through self

In: The Annotated Critical Laozi

of “self-so” presented in the Laozi . In accordance with this advocacy of “self-so” behavior and development, Laozi further puts forth his conception of “non-action,” which aims to allow for people’s various different aspirations to achieve harmonious balance. The application of the teachings of

In: The Annotated Critical Laozi

were anxious about inner and outer balance, hygienic and social rules. Sexual freedom was not a carnal sin but rather a threat to social morality and customs. 1897 Hawkes, tr., vol. 2, p. 91 ( Honglou meng , ch. 29).

In: The Culture of Love in China and Europe

apparent contradiction in dealing with emotions: on the one side Daoist texts show a negative attitude toward passions, urge their suppression before they are manifested, in order to save the vital energy and keep man’s balance; 76 on the other side, these texts recognise some basic genuine feelings. The

In: The Culture of Love in China and Europe

analysed in terms of our everyday concept of friendship; for, as the principles whose balance it consists in – love and respect – it is also separated from the feelings. What Kant says explicitly about love characterizes the both principles united in friendship: „But in any case, the love in friendship

In: The Culture of Love in China and Europe

a theoretically well-balanced account of the Christian concept of love and that of marriage where the obvious price to be paid for the wellness of the balance is a considerable reduction of love’s erotic side. 3 Andreas Capellanus and Love’s Labours in His On Love Having considered some main

In: The Culture of Love in China and Europe