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Nigel Strudwick

Edited by Ronald Leprohon

Ancient Egypt is well known for its towering monuments and magnificent statuary, but other aspects of its civilization are less well known, especially its written texts. Now Texts from the Pyramid Age provides ready access to new translations of a representative selection of texts ranging from the historically significant to the repetitive formulae of the tomb inscriptions from Old Kingdom Egypt (ca. 2700–2170 B.C.). These royal and private inscriptions, coming from both the secular and religious milieus and from all kinds of physical contexts, not only shed light on the administration, foreign expeditions, and funerary beliefs of the period but also bring to life the Egyptians themselves, revealing how they saw the world and how they wanted the world to see them. Strudwick’s helpful introduction to the history and literature of this seminal period provides important background for reading and understanding these historical texts. Like other volumes in the Writings from the Ancient World series, this work will soon become a standard with students and scholars alike.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)

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Kathryn A. Bard and Rodolfo Fattovich

/Wadi Gawasis Religion is a system of beliefs, and the rituals practiced at Saww and the monuments and commemorative stelae left there should be understood within the context of traditions of ancient Egyptian religion: the cult deities of the Egyptian state, the belief in the god-king and service to him, as

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Kathryn A. Bard and Rodolfo Fattovich

materials. The Egyptian king commanded vast resources, both human and material, and these resources were focused on specific projects within the Egyptian belief system, especially the construction of royal mortuary monuments and cult temples. The large-scale procurement of exotic resources and raw materials

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Ľubica Hudáková

regard to the daily life or religious beliefs. The multilayered information provided by the scenes is difficult to assess when dealing with part of the decoration only, namely that including representations of women. Due to this restriction, this field of research is only dealt with to a limited extent

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Vanessa Davies

Ancient Art, Burial and Belief , edited by Catherine M. Draycott and Maria Stamatopoulou , 129 – 172 . Colloquia antiqua 16. Leuven : Peeters , 2016 . Harrington , Nicola. Living with the Dead: Ancestor Worship and Mortuary Ritual in Ancient Egypt . Oxford : Oxbow Books , 2013

From Daffodils to Derrida

Later Popular Reception (1931–1972)

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Steve Vinson

to do field research into Voodoo belief and practices in Louisiana, Haiti and Jamaica. 79 In her work in Haiti, Hurston had recorded folk-traditions that identified Moses with Damballah Ouedo, among the most important Voodoo loa (gods), for whom the snake was a particularly powerful symbol. 80

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Gianluca Miniaci

, demography, and health issues. 8 Ultimately, the correlation between the change in burial equipment composition/funerary beliefs and the number of individuals sharing the same funerary context has received little attention. 9 Yet, in ancient Egypt the arrangement of bodies in funerary rooms was not

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Sylvie Donnat

the authoritative value of writings before the Middle Kingdom. To fully understand this ritual practice, written communications to the dead must consequently not only be studied as historical sources on Egyptian funerary beliefs, but also as a specific phenomenon of elite Egyptian funerary culture

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Ľubica Hudáková

course of transformations related to the tomb decoration and funerary belief. According to Gauthier-Laurent, the decorative programme became more individual in that period and the hair-dressing scene might have been created to decorate coffins of women. 73 In this respect, the examples in the tomb of

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Susanne Bickel

categories of text compositions formulate the projection of self within the frames of the Egyptian belief system and the respective anticipated social spheres. They target and prepare the deceased’s integration into the sphere of the living and the sphere of the gods respectively, and formulate the self