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The People of the Dead Sea Scrolls

Their Writings, Beliefs and Practices

Julio Trebolle Barrera and Florentino García Martínez

This book, written jointly by two distinguished Qumran scholars, attempts to provide answers to some important questions that have been discussed recently in media reports on the Dead Sea Scrolls, such as: have certain manuscripts been suppressed?; do the manuscripts question substantial aspects of the Jewish and Christian traditions?; do the roots of Early Christianity derive from the Essene movement?; and more.
This volume offers solid and up-to-date information on the literary heritage, the social organization and the religious beliefs of the Qumran community and its links with Early Christianity. It gives the reader an opportunity to look behind the scenes of the research of the Dead Sea texts and the ongoing scholarly debate on the origins of the Essene movement and the Qumran sect.

Series:

Paul Heger

Some literary expressions in the Dead Sea Scrolls led scholars to allege that their authors professed a dualistic and deterministic worldview of Zoroastrian origin and that the omission of Moses and Sinai from the Enoch writings evinces that a segment in Jewish society marginalized the Torah, adopting Enoch’s prophecies as its ethical guideline. This study challenges these allegations as utterly conflicting with essential biblical doctrines and the unequivocal beliefs and expectations of Qumran’s Torah-centered society, arguing that scholars’ allegations are erroneously based on interpreting ancient texts with a modern mindset and influenced by the interpreter’s personal cultural background. The study interprets the relevant texts in a manner compatible with the presumed doctrines of ancient Jewish authors and readers.

Time to Prepare the Way in the Wilderness

Papers on the Qumran Scrolls by Fellows of the Institute for Advanced Studies of The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 1989-1990

Series:

Lawrence Schiffman

Edited by Devorah Dimant

This collection of articles on the Dead Sea Scrolls by fellows at the Institute for Advanced Studies of The Hebrew University (1989-1990) represents the ongoing work of editing and interpreting one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of the century. This volume includes articles on the contents and significance of the scrolls, the biblical scrolls, the legal rulings of the sectarians and their prayer texts.

All the Glory of Adam

Liturgical Anthropology in the Dead Sea Scrolls

Series:

Crispin H.T. Fletcher-Louis

All the Glory of Adam examines Dead Sea Scroll texts which pertain to the Qumran community’s understanding of (a) a transcendent, angelomorphic or divine humanity and (b) the role of cultic space and time, and the experience of worship, in the formation of such a humanity.
The book contains twelve chapters. The first three are devoted to material which either antedates or provides important cognate material to the peculiarly sectarian material studied in the remaining chapters (esp. the Book of Noah and Sirach). Chapters 4-6 examine texts devoted to a divine humanity (4Q381, Hodayoth, 1Q/4QInstruction etc.), the divine or angelic Moses (4Q374 & 4Q377) and the heavenly human priesthood (1QSb, 4Q511, 4Q418 81, 4Q545, 4Q541, 4Q468b etc.). The seventh chapter discusses the mystical and theophanic significance of the high priest’s breastpiece at Qumran. Chapters 8-11 are a revisionist reading of the Songs of the Sabbath Sacrifice as a liturgy for a divine humanity and chapter 13 proposes a new interpretation of 1QM 10-17 in the same vein.
Apart from all DSS scholars the book will be useful for anyone working on biblical anthropology, messianism and Christology, and temple or cultic theology.

Tigchelaar and Florentino García Martínez

The first part of a 2-volume work, this is a practical reference tool to facilitate access to the Qumran collection of the Dead Sea Scrolls. It contains newly edited Hebrew and Aramaic transcriptions and English translations of the non-biblical scrolls on facing pages, arranged by serial number from Cave 1 to Cave 11. In addition, it offers a summary of the contents of the biblical scrolls from Qumran. Each Q-number is provided with a heading which contains the essential information on the text and selected bibliographical references. Although unidentified and unclassified fragments have been omitted, and no snippets of manuscripts have been reproduced, this edition aims to be complete for the non-biblical scrolls.
The work is primarily intended for classroom use and for use by specialists from other disciplines who need a reliable compendium to all the materials found. It will also be useful as a companion for those studying the original manuscripts using the microfiche or CD-ROM editions of the scrolls.

The Dead Sea Scrolls Study Edition (2 vols.)

Vol. I: 1Q1-4Q273 - Vol. II: 4Q274-11Q31

Edited by Tigchelaar and Florentino García Martínez

The Dead Sea Scrolls Study Edition is a practical reference tool to facilitate access to the Qumran collection of the Dead Sea Scrolls. It contains newly edited Hebrew and Aramaic transcriptions and English translations of the non-biblical scrolls on facing pages, arranged by serial number from Cave 1 to Cave 11. In addition, it offers a summary of the contents of the biblical scrolls from Qumran. Each Q-number is provided with a heading which contains the essential information on the text and selected bibliographical references. Although unidentified and unclassified fragments have been omitted, and no snippets of manuscripts have been reproduced, this edition aims to be complete for the non-biblical scrolls.
The work is primarily intended for classroom use and for use by specialists from other disciplines who need a reliable compendium to all the materials found. It will also be useful as a companion for those studying the original manuscripts using the microfiche or CD-ROM editions of the scrolls.
A considerable part of the materials was already accessible in translation in The Dead Sea Scrolls Translated (Wilfred G.E. Watson, Translator). This translation has served as the base-text of the translations presented in this edition, but has been thoroughly checked and corrected by the authors.

Edited by Tigchelaar and Florentino García Martínez

The second part of a 2-volume work, this is a practical reference tool to facilitate access to the Qumran collection of the Dead Sea Scrolls. It contains newly edited Hebrew and Aramaic transcriptions and English translations of the non-biblical scrolls on facing pages, arranged by serial number from Cave 1 to Cave 11. In addition, it offers a summary of the contents of the biblical scrolls from Qumran. Each Q-number is provided with a heading which contains the essential information on the text and selected bibliographical references. Although unidentified and unclassified fragments have been omitted, and no snippets of manuscripts have been reproduced, this edition aims to be complete for the non-biblical scrolls.
The work is primarily intended for classroom use and for use by specialists from other disciplines who need a reliable compendium to all the materials found. It will also be useful as a companion for those studying the original manuscripts using the microfiche or CD-ROM editions of the scrolls.

Der Midrasch zur Eschatologie aus der Qumrangemeinde (4QMidrEschat a.b)

Materielle Rekonstruktion, Textbestand, Gattung und traditionsgeschichtliche Einordnung des durch 4Q174 (“Florilegium”) und 4Q177 (“Catena A”) repräsentierten Werkes aus den Qumranfunden

Series:

Annette Steudel

This volume deals with one of the oldest midrashim, the Eschatological Midrash from Qumran Cave 4. 4QMidrEschat, previously unknown, is preserved in at least two copies (4QFlorilegium, 4QCatena A) found at Qumran.
A reconstruction of 4QFlorilegium and 4QCatena A is given in the first part of the book. The second part is a comparative analysis which shows that both manuscripts are copies of the same former work, 4QMidrEschat. The third part deals with the other exegetical Qumran texts, a definition of 4QMidrEschat's genre, its position among the Qumran literature, and its dating.
4QMidrEschat provides valuable information on Bible interpretation and eschatology among the Essenes in the first century BCE. 4QMidrEschat is of special significance because, according to recent studies, the Essenes are no longer to be regarded as a "sect", but as one of the most important Jewish groups of that time.

Ari Mermelstein

. 5 This perspective, to be elaborated below, views emotions as expressions of belief about objects, people, or behavior, views of the sort delineated in the previous paragraph. These beliefs, moreover, are culturally conditioned, serving to align the beliefs of individuals with those of their group