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Abraham Ibn Ezra on Nativities and Continuous Horoscopy

A Parallel Hebrew-English Critical Edition of the Book of Nativities and the Book of Revolution. Abraham Ibn Ezra’s Astrological Writings, Volume 4

Series:

Shlomo Sela

The present volume offers the first critical edition, accompanied with English translation and commentary, of Sefer ha-Moladot, which addresses the doctrine of nativities and the system of continuous horoscopy in nativities, and of Sefer ha-Tequfah, which is devoted exclusively to continuous horoscopy in nativities. The doctrine of nativities makes predictions about the whole of an individual’s subsequent life on the basis of the natal chart, and the system of continuous horoscopy in nativities is concerned with the interval between life and death and makes predictions based mainly on anniversary horoscopes, which are juxtaposed with the natal horoscope. To Abraham Ibn Ezra’s mind, not only are these two doctrines the core of astrology; they also epitomize the praxis of the astrological métier.

“Sela...has provided explanatory appendices and very interesting notes about Jewish attitudes toward the sciences and astrology in the middle ages.” Reference & Research Book News, 2013.

Series:

Michael McVaugh, Gerrit Bos and Joseph Shatzmiller

,” sometimes placing it in quotation marks when we want to emphasize that uncertainty. 42 It will be seen that this proposed sequence of events is consistent with our belief that the Latin translation was made from Arabic, not from a preliminary Hebrew version (above, p. 21). If the Latin was indeed prepared

Series:

Michael McVaugh, Gerrit Bos and Joseph Shatzmiller

. Our proposed interpolation arises out of our belief that the original author of chapters 21–34 (‘section II ’) had also written a number of separate chapters on individual diseases, to which he actually makes specific references later, in chapter 28. See the introduction above, pp. 141–42. 184 This

Aramaic Bowl Spells

Jewish Babylonian Aramaic Bowls Volume One

Series:

Shaul Shaked, James Nathan Ford and Siam Bhayro

The corpus of Aramaic incantation bowls from Sasanian Mesopotamia is perhaps the most important source we have for studying the everyday beliefs and practices of the Jewish, Christian, Mandaean, Manichaean, Zoroastrian and Pagan communities on the eve of the Islamic conquests. The bowls are from the Schøyen Collection, which has some 650 texts in different varieties of Aramaic: Jewish Aramaic, Mandaic and Syriac, and forms the largest collection of its kind anywhere in the world. This volume presents editions of sixty-four Jewish Aramaic incantation bowls, with accompanying introductions, translations, philological notes, photographs and indices. The themes covered include the magical divorce and the accounts of the wonder-working sages Ḥanina ben Dosa and Joshua bar Peraḥia. It is the first of a multi-volume project that aims to publish the entire Schøyen Collection of Aramaic incantation bowls.

Aramaic Magic Bowls in the Vorderasiatisches Museum in Berlin

Descriptive List and Edition of Selected Texts

Series:

Siam Bhayro, James Nathan Ford, Dan Levene and Ortal-Paz Saar

The collection of Aramaic magic bowls and related objects in the Vorderasiatisches Museum in Berlin is one of the most important in the world. This book presents a description of each object and its contents, including details of users and other names, biblical quotations, parallel texts, and linguistic features. Combined with the detailed indices, the present volume makes the Berlin collection accessible for further research. Furthermore, sixteen texts, which are representative of the whole collection, are edited. This book results from an impressive collaboration between Siam Bhayro, James Nathan Ford, Dan Levene, and Ortal-Paz Saar, with further contributions by Matthew Morgenstern, Marco Moriggi, and Naama Vilozny, and will be of interest for all those engaged in the study of these fascinating objects.

Series:

Alex Kerner

typical speech communities, it had several languages (Spanish, Portuguese and Hebrew) that differentiated it from the surrounding society. Not just their religious beliefs or their ethnic origins set them apart from English society; their essence as a speech community, their linguistic repertoires were

Series:

Daniel J. Lasker, Johannes Niehoff-Panagiotidis and David Sklare

) and justice ( ʿadl ). The major characteristics of a Kalām work are as follows: (1) an epistemological introduction justifying the need for rational investigation as a prerequisite for religious belief and a list of definitions of terms; (2) proofs for creation of the world in order to demonstrate

Series:

Alex Kerner

of the power of print and as prolific publishers 4 they used the press to disseminate their beliefs, 5 as well as to set boundaries between themselves and other religious groups and maintain the community’s internal cohesion by “tempering the spirit.” 6 In the second half of the seventeenth

Series:

Alex Kerner

permitted the public observance of their law causes them a thousand evils,” he writes and further alludes to the widespread flawed belief among many of the Nation that they can atone for these sins by giving charity. Charity, Nieto clarifies, “saves from death,” as the saying goes, but only if the other