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Michelle M. Hamilton

In Beyond Faith: Belief, Morality and Memory in a Fifteenth-Century Judeo-Iberian Manuscript, Michelle M. Hamilton sheds light on the concerns of Jewish and converso readers of the generation before the Expulsion. Using a mid-fifteenth-century collection of Iberian vernacular literary, philosophical and religious texts (MS Parm. 2666) recorded in Hebrew characters as a lens, Hamilton explores how its compiler or compilers were forging a particular form of personal, individual religious belief, based not only on the Judeo-Andalusi philosophical tradition of medieval Iberia, but also on the Latinate humanism of late 14th and early 15th-century Europe. The form/s such expressions take reveal the contingent and specific engagement of learned Iberian Jews and conversos with the larger Iberian, European and Arab Mediterranean cultures of the 15th-century.

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Garrett P.J. Epp

Abstract

While the Wycliffite Tretise of Miraclis Pleyinge famously condemns religious theatre as sinful idleness and ‘signs without deed,’ biblical drama has the potential to be highly productive, as a form of performative theology. Much like the meditative mode of affective piety, likewise common in the later Middle Ages, when undertaken seriously by or for those who believe in what it represents, the performance of biblical drama can create rather than merely represent theological meaning. This paper examines a variety of texts and performances, medieval and modern, in order to demonstrate how religious belief and theatrical make-believe can intertwine.


Staging Scripture

Biblical Drama, 1350-1600

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Edited by Peter Happé and Wim Hüsken

Against a background which included revolutionary changes in religious belief, extensive enlargement of dramatic styles and the technological innovation of printing, this collection of essays about biblical drama offers innovative approaches to text and performance, while reviewing some well-established critical issues. The Bible in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries appears in a complex of roles in relation to the drama: as an authority and centre of belief, a place of controversy, an emotional experience and, at times, a weapon. This collection brings into focus the new biblical learning, including the re-editing of biblical texts, as well as classical influences, and it gives a unique view of the relationship between the Bible and the drama at a critical time for both.

Contributors are: Stephanie Allen, David Bevington, Philip Butterworth, Sarah Carpenter, Philip Crispin, Clifford Davidson, Elisabeth Dutton, Garrett P. J. Epp, Bob Godfrey, Peter Happé, James McBain, Roberta Mullini, Katie Normington, Margaret Rogerson, Charlotte Steenbrugge, Greg Walker, and Diana Wyatt.

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Drew Thomas

. As Luther’s reform gained more and more adherents, a wide range of new ideas emerged. To clarify his positions, Luther issued several broadsheets that explained his beliefs. Sometimes these confuted the beliefs of catholic opponents, but often they were directed against others on the side of reform

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Abaigéal Warfield

understood. Rather than simply labelling belief in witchcraft as illogical, historians now try to comprehend the logic of witchcraft belief on its own terms. The linguistic turn of the 1990s undoubtedly had a major impact on witchcraft scholars, who turned to texts to see how witchcraft was framed and

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Amelie Roper

1560s onwards reduced the need for musical attacks on those with other beliefs. 65 Certainly, the lower levels of production in the second half of the sixteenth century support this thesis. Nevertheless, the desire to express confessional fervour through the medium of song was not extinguished

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Flavia Bruni

Maria sopra Minerva to establish a public library in Rome [“fondare una biblioteca publica in Roma”]. 5 This was part of a wider plan for the preservation of the Catholic faith against the relaxation of moral standards and the steady progress of heretic beliefs. The library opened on 3 November 1701 to

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Valentina Sebastiani

circle at the Froben printing-house saw things as Erasmus did, however. Between 1521 and 1525, Wolfgang Capito, Johannes Oecolampadius, and Conrad Pellikan, among others, embraced the Reformation and looked for other opportunities—and other printers—that would allow them to express their beliefs more

Series:

Peter Happé

Abstract

This essay is a comparison between ways of dramatizing the Resurrection in England and France. It establishes a core of items which are incorporated in many versions, short and long, as well as non-biblical elements which are frequently attached to the scriptural details. The experience of possible audiences who must have drawn upon existing recollected items is considered as well as the inclusion of musical and visual referents. The dramatic structure and development of the chosen plays are reviewed in order to illustrate the variety of the theatrical elements. Attention is paid to the reasons for including the Resurrection, which for some plays was a matter of defining, rehearsing or sustaining belief. Such material is relevant to the central item in Resurrection sequences, the moment when Christ rises from the tomb, and the way this is presented in the dramatic texts. The reticence with which this is treated is found to be one of the essential aspects of the dramatizations, which are largely influenced by versions in the Scriptures but are not entirely determined by them. This aspect of the plays is shown to be performed in ways which sustain the mystery inherent in it, and this is seen against a background of belief in what was familiar though it had a sustained spiritual reference.


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Tarek Kahlaoui

-Rashīd’s (d. 193/809) project to open the Mediterranean to Baḥr al-Qulzum (the Red Sea) shows his belief that the Mediterranean functioned as a frontier/passage. The anecdote relates that for Hārūn’s advisers, such a project would have been a strategic mistake, since it would give the Rūm’s ships access to