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Series:

Rodger Williamson

central to his analysis of Japan.” (Ronan, 1997 , p.180) To Hearn, according to Murray, “Celtic belief in fairies resulted in an imagination that was “romantic, poetic and also terrible” and his view of peasant life in Ireland was, in turn, remarkably similar to the Shinto-based ethos of pre-Meiji Japan

Series:

Rosa Branca Figueiredo

vision of history in A Dance of the Forests is, in fact, an index of his belief that it is impossible to divorce culture from its mythic origins. Soyinka is not exactly enthusiastic over the idea that human history is the history of progress and perfection, but he appears nevertheless certain that

Series:

Aytül Özüm

social and cultural dynamism, it is useful to draw attention to several differences between them in terms of the dominant beliefs each presents in relation to progress. In Ackroyd’s work, the narrating writer’s remembrance of London and his interpretation of the documents about the city show the place as

Series:

Peter Dayan

, Clémenceau, Garibaldi, and several characters from Marcel Proust’s A la recherche du temps perdu . This popularity and wide appeal among the social and artistic élite was not coincidental. The truly unique thing about the Chat Noir was the way it brought together the most absolute unshakeable belief in the

Series:

Kaisa Kurikka, Hanna Lahdenperä, Kristina Malmio and Julia Tidigs

is associated. Not with the North-African father, who is in fact quite secular, but with the convert, the girls’ Finland-Swedish mother. The foreigner is then converted into a person who is “ethnically Finnish”, man into woman, and mother-tongue into adopted language of faith and innermost beliefs

Series:

Jennifer Wood

[of a] closed social world, filled with the solidarity of family, kin and locality” (ibid.); an identity “rooted in kinship systems, […] religious beliefs, and in the continuity of tradition” (Morley & Robins, 1995 , p.87). In other words, it is a collective cultural/national identity expressed on a

Series:

Emily Petermann

beat up for stating their beliefs He wants a shoehorn, the kind with teeth Because he knows there’s no such thing “Shoehorn with Teeth”, 1987; released on Lincoln , 1988 This is actually more surreal than nonsensical, I would argue. The odd central image of the “shoehorn with teeth”, of which there is

Series:

Brigitte Le Juez and Bill Richardson

lenses. Conventional perceptions and images of different types of loci can lead to misapprehensions, and to people defining themselves, or being defined, according to distorted beliefs or even discriminatory attitudes. Thus, themes linked to issues of identity, such as desire, nostalgia, memory, hope

Series:

Brigitte Le Juez

: “There are lieux de mémoire , sites of memory, because there are no longer milieux de mémoire , real environments of memory” (Nora, 1989 , p.7). For Nora, memory is attached to sites and is permanently actual and evolving. H Story , to some extent, challenges Nora’s beliefs because Hiroshima, like

Series:

Gabriel F.Y. Tsang

choosing to love a country girl to returning to Prague because of her, and then being expelled to the countryside because of his political beliefs, Tomas realizes that his personal belonging to Prague carries more weight than his emotional bond with Tereza. Prague has framed Tomas’s identity and