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Edited by Mark Bevir and Andrius Gališanka

Wittgenstein and Normative Inquiry examines the relevance of Ludwig Wittgenstein's philosophy for ethics, aesthetics, political philosophy, and religion. It analyzes the intellectual contexts which shaped Wittgenstein's normative thought, traces his influences, and presents contemporary uses of his philosophy in normative fields.

The chapters focus on the nature of normative inquiry. Together, they present a Wittgensteinian approach to normative inquiry, which, while broad and contested, stands in contrast to dominant deductive approaches. Arguing to normative conclusions by showing family resemblances, drawing analogies, using persuasion, appealing to naturalist arguments, authors and Wittgensteinians discussed by them expand our notion of normative inquiry.

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Estelle Ferrarese

coincide with a network of relations), ecological and existential (they refer to belief systems and to culture in the broad sense). On this view, moral obligation mainly weighs on the subject under threat, who is enjoined to get back up after being struck down, and secondarily on the state, which is

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James Furner

’s claim is sometimes greeted with incredulity, but it is impeccable. It would not be inconsistent to believe both that Marx had founded a worthwhile project, and that later research had disproved all of ‘Marx’s individual propositions’. The latter does not imply the different belief that later research

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James Furner

expected to receive. An in-order-to motive is described with reference to a convention if it is characterised as the goal of having strengthened others’ beliefs that they can show their disapproval of deviant behaviour with assurance, or of having avoided another’s approbation. As long as the descriptions

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James Furner

subjective test if they were found to have acted on the belief that the thing had an untamed life of its own (for example, that it is a wild animal that is merely wounded), even if the thing did not in fact have an untamed life of its own (it is in fact dead). The criterion for the second aspect of detention

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James Furner

generalised existence of a type of interaction may explain a normative expectation even without any further differentiation of those who take part in it. As we will suggest in chapter 9, a belief in the principle of self-ownership can be explained by appeal to generalised purchase and sale, and a social