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Bilha Blum

Dismantling the conventional plot-character-space unity that characterises drama in general, and neglecting the role of narrative embedded in it, has lately become the axis of postmodern performance practice. Defined by Hans-Thies Lehmann as ‘postdramatic theatre’ and by Elinor Fuchs as the kind of theatre in which character is dead or dying, it emphasises the conspicuous prioritising of the visual over the textual typical of this era. Among its main qualities, realised by means of visual constructs which include the replacement of the dramatic character by a body in space, is the cancellation of the focused referential frame or logocentric logic often offered by drama, thus becoming presentational: i.e., presenting the elements of performance as themselves, rather than as re-presentational of the real. Followed by a multiplication of frames or, alternatively, by the abandonment of frames altogether, the result is the emergence of a multifarious range of possible ‘looking standpoints’ that leave the spectators’ expectations for coherence and integration unfulfilled. The specific case of staging canonical plays, which presupposes not only the presence of a written text in performance but one that is also at the very core of accepted cultural practices and beliefs, problematises the issues of visualisation and looking, placing them at a conflicting crossroads. Seen as ‘the true art of memory,’ as defined by Harold Bloom, staged canonical plays would seem to retain their representational status and their evocative power despite postdramatic visualising strategies. The question thus arises as to whether the visual signs of such performances, intertwined with representational attributes, can nonetheless function as non-referential autonomous entities and objectify the spectators’ gaze. Thomas Ostermeier’s 2005 production of Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler and Lee Breuer’s 2003 production of Mabou Mines’ DollHouse serve here as my main examples in engaging with these issues.

Bilha Blum

Dismantling the conventional plot-character-space unity that characterizes drama in general and neglecting the role of narrative embedded in it has lately become the axis of postmodern performance practice. Defined by Hans-Thies Lehmann as ‘postdramatic theatre’ and by Elinor Fuchs as the kind of theatre in which character is dead or dying, it emphasizes the conspicuous prioritizing of the visual upon the textual typical of this era. Among its main qualities, realized by means of visual constructs which include the replacement of the dramatic character by a body in space, is the cancellation of the focused referential frame or logocentric logic often offered by drama, thus becoming presentational, i.e. presenting the elements of performance as themselves, rather than re-presentational of the real. Followed by a multiplication of frames, or rather by the annulment of frames altogether, the result of this cancellation is the emergence of a multifarious range of possible ‘looking standpoints’ that leave the spectators’ expectations for coherence and integrality unaccomplished. The specific case of staging canonical plays, which presupposes not only the presence of a written text in performance but one that is at the very core of accepted cultural practices and beliefs, problematizes the issues of visualization and looking, placing them at a conflicting crossroads. Seen as ‘the true art of memory,’ as defined by Harold Bloom, staged canonical plays would seem to retain their representational status and their evocative power despite postdramatic visualizing strategies. The question is then, whether the visual signs of such performances, intertwined with representational attributes, can nonetheless function as unreferential autonomous entities and objectify the spectators’ look. Thomas Ostermeier’s version of Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler (2005) and Mabou Mines’ DollHouse, directed by Lee Breuer (2003) will serve as my main examples in dealing with these issues.

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Edited by Annette W. Balkema and Henk Slager

In the current debate on art, thought on time has commanded a prominent position. Do we live in a posthistorical time? Has objective art historical time and belief in a continual progress shifted to a more subjective experience of the ephemeral? Has (art) history fallen away and, if so, what does this mean for the future of art? How does a visual archive relate to artistic memory?
This volume investigates positions, arguments and comments regarding the stated theme. Philosophers and theorists explore the subject matter theoretically. Curators articulate the practice of art. The participants are: Hans Belting, Jan Bor, Peter Bürger, Bart Cassiman, Leontine Coelewij, Hubert Damisch, Arthur C. Danto, Bart De Baere, Okwui Enwezor, Kasper König, Sven Lütticken, Manifesta (Barbara VanderLinden), Hans Ulrich Obrist, Donald Preziosi, Survival of the Past Project (Herman Parret, Lex Ter Braak, Camiel Van Winkel), Ernst Van Alphen, Kirk Varnedoe, Gianni Vattimo, and Kees Vuyk.

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Edited by Martin F. Norden

The popular media of film and television surround us daily with images of evil - images that have often gone critically unexamined. In the belief that people in ever-increasing numbers are turning to the media for their understanding of evil, this lively and provocative collection of essays addresses the changing representation of evil in a broad spectrum of films and television programmes. Written in refreshingly accessible and de-jargonised prose, the essays bring to bear a variety of philosophical and critical perspectives on works ranging from the cinema of famed director Alfred Hitchcock and the preternatural horror films Halloween and Friday the 13th to the understated documentary Human Remains and the television coverage of the immediate post-9/11 period. The Changing Face of Evil in Film and Television is for anyone interested in the moving-image representation of that pervasive yet highly misunderstood thing we call evil.

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Mireille Rosello

Abstract

Ismaël Ferrouhki’s Le Grand Voyage follows a father and a son who leave Aix-en-Provence to drive to Mecca together. The emphasis on religion, migration, generational and cultural or national differences invites us to place the film within a recognizable French cinematographic tradition: at first sight, Le Grand Voyage could be one of those “beur” or “banlieue” films, whose focus on the lives of migrants from formerly colonized territories in North Africa have gradually imposed a familiar aesthetic grammar. I argue, however, that Ferroukhi breaks with those well-known genres and experiments with a new type of migratory aesthetics. His Babelized road movie does not represent Islam as the other’s exotic religion, an unknown set of dogmas that is either feared or treated as a block of alterity. In Le Grand Voyage both protagonists are Muslims, but the film shows that religion is both what they have in common and what creates divisions between them. What matters is not so much the representation of Islam or even the notion that Islam is multiple, as the way in which each character relates to his own religious beliefs.

This new point of view is constructed by the film’s treatment of geography and language. Although the father and the son travel together, their journeys are radically different. The film reflects on this disconnection by simultaneously producing two different superposed cinematographic maps of Europe, and by demonstrating that each character adopts a unique way of communicating with the strangers that they meet on the way.

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Natalie C. McCreesh, Christopher R. Jones, Alex McIntosh and Helen Storey

a shared belief that issues of cost (limiting/not passing costs onto the customer), communication (lack of a common language to talk about sustainability) and customer relations (awareness of consumer profile) were central to efforts to successfully establish initiatives designed to promote more

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Alice Morin

Photography defined icons as ‘representations that inspire some degree of awe – perhaps mixed with dread, compassion, or aspiration – and that stand for an epoch or a system of beliefs’ adding that ‘icons almost instantly acquired symbolic overtones’. 2 Rouquet goes on to underline the adoption of the word

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Alessia Grassi, Steve Swindells and Stephen Wigley

inspiration that designers find in art; 4 from artists belief, at the beginning of the 20th century, to be the best in designing garments, 5 to the growing trend of exhibiting fashion items as pieces of art in museums and galleries. 6 However, previous studies of this relationship have not dealt with a

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Susanne Schulz

, ‘design-led’ retailer Sophia and Sarah’s statements not only highlight their belief that it is important for retailers to develop their unique style in order to distinguish themselves from other retailers, but they also allude to the inherent problem of product sameness found among high-street retailers

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Prudence Gibson

, in 2008 the Swiss government made an amendment to acknowledge the moral rights of plants. Now, Switzerland’s law takes a biocentric position endorsing ‘the belief that all forms of life are equally valuable and that humanity is not the center of existence.’ 53 Ecuador also amended its constitution