Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • All: "black" x
  • Drama & Theatre Studies x
Clear All

The Play within the Play

The Performance of Meta-Theatre and Self-Reflection

Series:

Edited by Gerhard Fischer and Bernhard Greiner

The thirty chapters of this innovative international study are all devoted to the topic of the play within the play. The authors explore the wide range of aesthetic, literary-theoretical and philosophical issues associated with this rhetorical device, not only in terms of its original meta-theatrical setting – from the baroque idea of a theatrum mundi onward to contemporary examples of postmodern self-referential dramaturgy – but also with regard to a variety of different generic applications, e.g. in narrative fiction, musical theatre and film. The authors, internationally recognized specialists in their respective fields, draw on recent debates in such areas as postcolonial studies, game and systems theories, media and performance studies, to analyze the specific qualities and characteristics of the play within the play: as ultimate affirmation of the ‘self’ (the ‘Hamlet paradigm’), as a self-reflective agency of meta-theatrical discourse, and as a vehicle of intermedial and intercultural transformation. The challenging study, with its underlying premise of play as a key feature of cultural anthropology and human creativity, breaks new ground by placing the play within the play at the centre of a number of intersecting scholarly discourses on areas of topical concern to scholars in the humanities.

Centre Stage

Contemporary Drama in Austria

Series:

Edited by Frank Finlay and Ralf Jeutter

In this volume, scholars and theatre practioners from Austria, Britain and Germany explore the current state of Austrian drama in studies of the themes, forms and concerns of some of the most important contemporary playwrights. Many of the contributions address works which have not previously been the subject of scholarly analysis. The writers discussed include: Wolfgang Bauer, Thomas Bernhard, Elias Canetti, Peter Handke, Fritz Hochwälder, Elfriede Jelinek, Jakov Lind, Felix Mitterer, Hermann Nitsch, Gerhard Roth, Werner Schwab, Marlene Steeruwitz, Peter Turrini, and the film-maker, Wim Wenders.
This collection, which includes photographs and an essay on the problems of translating, will be of particular interest to teachers, students and translators of German-language drama, as well as to a wider theatre-going public.

Series:

Edited by Yann Mével, Dominique Rabaté and Sjef Houppermans

Playing the Market

The Market Theatre, Johannesburg. Revised and updated edition

Series:

Anne Fuchs

The relationship between Johannesburg’s Market Theatre and the economic and political forces of South Africa's apartheid regime was both complex and somewhat ambiguous. The theatre's two founders, Mannie Manim and Barney Simon, however, from idealistic beginnings managed to steer their experimental enterprise around pitfalls ranging from censorship, boycotts and recuperation by big business to the difficulties encountered in finding black authors, let alone black audiences.
If the place occupied by the Market institution in apartheid society is emphasized throughout the present study, its contribution to the aesthetic of resistance is also underlined through detailed criticism of the plays and authors dominating the theatre. Pieter-Dirk Uys, Barney Simon's workshop plays and, among others, Black Consciousness plays are subjected to various methods of theatre performance analysis. The reckoning that had to come in the early 1990s revealed itself as globally positive; the reasons for this may be found in the updated concluding part of Playing the Market, which is composed of more general essays (including one on the vibrant Junction Avenue Theatre Company) on how the theatre scene in contemporary South Africa started to change. A postscript reveals more specific aspects of the Market situation in the late 1990s when its hegemony in the New South Africa was already being questioned.

Voices of Justice and Reason

Apartheid and Beyond in South African Literature

Series:

Geoffrey V. Davis

Over the past fifty years transformations of great moment have taken place in South Africa. Apartheid and the subsequent transition to a democratic, non-racial society in particular have exercised a profound effect on the practice of literature.
This study traces the development of literature under apartheid, then seeks to identify the ways in which writers and theatre practitioners are now facing the challenges of a new social order.
The main focus is on the work of black writers, prime among them Matsemela Manaka, Mtutuzeli Matshoba and Richard Rive, who, as politically committed members of the oppressed majority, bore witness to the “black experience” through their writing. Despite the draconian censorship system they were able to address the social problems caused by racial discrimination in all areas of life, particularly through forced removals, the migrant labour system, and the creation of the homelands. Their writing may be read both as a comprehensive record of everyday life under apartheid and as an alternative cultural history of South Africa.
Particular attention is paid to theatre as a barometer of social change in South Africa.
The concluding chapters consider how in the current period of transition writers and arts institutions have set about reassessing their priorities, redefining their function and seeking new aesthetic directions in taking up the challenge of imagining a new society.

Series:

Edited by Gareth Griffiths

John Romeril has been one of the most prolific contributors to Australian theatre in the last twenty years. But since until recently few of his plays have been published, he has had inadequate recognition. As a founding member of the APG he was 'in at the start' of the revival of the so-called New Wave in Australian drama in the sixties. Romeril continues to be a leading influence in contemporary theatre. His work ranges from the well-known The Floating World (1974) to such recent successes as the community based play The Kelly Dance (1984), the mainstream drama Lost Weekend (1989) and the political play Black Cargo (1991). John Romeril is truly the great survivor of modern Australian theatre.

Fontomfrom

Contemporary Ghanaian Literature, Theatre and Film

Series:

Edited by Kofi Anyidoho and James Gibbs

Series:

Jonathan Bollen, Adrian Kiernander and Bruce Parr