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In: Indo-Muslim Cultures in Transition
Author: Walter Spink
Ajanta:Year by Year is planned as a biography of this remarkable site, starting with the earliest caves, dating from some two thousand years, to its startling renaissance in the brief period between approximately 462 and 480. Concentrating on the excavations of the later period, during the reign of the Vakataka emperor Harisena, it attempts to show how, after a surprising gap of some three hundred years, Ajanta’s proud and pious courtly patrons and its increasingly committed workmen created not only the greatest but the latest monument of India’s Golden Age. Nearly three hundred illustrations, in color and black and white, reveal the exuberant flowering of Ajanta and related Vakataka monuments, as well as the manner of their sudden demise.
Author: Lisa Owen
Drawing on art historical, epigraphical, and textual evidence, this book is the first full-scale reconstruction of medieval Jain artistic and devotional practices at the rock-cut site of Ellora in Maharashtra, India. Created during the ninth and tenth centuries, Ellora's Jain caves are among the best-preserved examples of medieval Jain art in India. While this book briefly addresses traditional art historical issues of date and iconography, it primarily considers the articulation of sacred space within the caves and the role of imagery in shaping devotional practices. Building upon scholarship that examines Jainism within its larger South Asian context, this book also explores connections between the Jain monuments and their Hindu and Buddhist counterparts to reveal a lived religious world at Ellora.
In: Indo-Iranian Journal
Author: Nirajan Kafle

gold and clothes to them. Moreover, one should offer a black milch-cow to Rudra.’ BhP ( KKT vol. vi, p. 248): śaktyā hiraṇyavāsāṁsi bhaktyā tebhyo nivedayet ‖ satilāḥ kṛṣṇakalaśā bhakṣyabhojyena saṃyutāḥ  | dvādaśātra pradātavyāś chatropānadyugānvitāḥ  | nivedayed yad rudrāya gāṃ tu kṛṣṇāṃ

In: Indo-Iranian Journal
Author: Juan Wu

did.” “How is it that they win, when their Vaiśālī has been captured? You did not make a living with your black begging bowl but instead claimed thorough knowledge, 53 and even that [i.e., your claim] turned out to be fruitless. Because you ruined our sphere of activity, we cannot even obtain alms. A

In: Indo-Iranian Journal
Author: Ruixuan Chen

purposeful and motivated, those in the latter case raise eyebrows and are condemned as black sheep in the flock: What is the point of the play on words? Is it germane to the context? Does it solely serve a humorous intent? Does it qualify as a pun at all? These are the questions that the critic who always

In: Indo-Iranian Journal

and a banishment outside of the English horizon of what almost unchangeably is called the ‘black fellows’” ( Kolff 1993 :638). But not many would go as far as Shore: he would go to annual fairs disguised as a native doctor so that he could hear what the people were talking about. 6 The Christian Faith

In: The European Encounter with Hinduism in India

). To all appearances, this was a conflict between the lazy traditionalism of older staff members and the praiseworthy idealism of younger people. But it is not that black and white. Kittel did not give the impression that he was well acquainted with the sensitivities of the local culture that the older

In: The European Encounter with Hinduism in India

to the Republic of India, are hardly part of pan-Indian culture. That was even less the case in Polo’s time, when the naked black tribes on these islands were viewed as extremely uncivilised. 4 Marco Polo wrote that they “were like wild beasts.” Their appearance contributed to his characterisation

In: The European Encounter with Hinduism in India