Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 50 items for :

  • All: "black" x
  • Early Modern History x
  • World Christianity x
  • Global History x
Clear All

Inquisition, an independent body ruled by the Spanish monarchy, to persuade them to follow Rome’s direction in matters concerning bishops, punishments, familiars, and jurisdiction. The results are unknown. Christopher Black presents a quantitative analysis of the kinds of crimes that the Modena inquisition

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

New York: Fordham University Press, 2016. Pp. xv + 368. Pb, $35. Robert Alvis’s White Eagle, Black Madonna: One Thousand Years of the Polish Catholic Tradition , promises to provide “an evenhanded, scholarly assessment” of a millennium of Polish Catholicism. The author has more than met his

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

among the Spanish readership, and more particularly among writers, has a number of points in common with what happened in the Catalan-Aragonese Crown, but also has its own distinctive features”? A similar state of affairs presents itself in the translation of Caigny’s essay. “Black,” for example, is

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

generic Spanish term peste used to describe epidemics: “Especially European diseases like smallpox and measles posed a big challenge to the Jesuit health care system because of the high infection and mortality rate among Indians, for which reason the Jesuits called these diseases pest (black death

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

incorporate a structural account of sin, Walatka turns to the example of “racial injustice against black Americans by means of slavery, Jim Crow laws, redlining housing policies, explicit racism, cultural bias, and the criminal justice system” (158). This aspect of Walatka’s argument shows that it may have

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

Bénin (former Dahomey), the Chevalier saw in 1724 or 1725 two slave-traders whom he called “Malais,” one black and one white, working in concert. They had alarmed the local people in Ouidah by their exact habit of jotting down prices and taking notes on local customs. The Chevalier knew, somehow, that

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

Hopkins’s style. By way of example, I first offer one poem to show the book’s methodology, then, by way of breadth, I record my own jottings as I read the rest of the poems. A complete poem by Robin Chapman typifies Hopkins’s influence today: Spare I watch the black crow, wing-wrenched, walking on

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

black field” or “black encampment” of nineteenth-century Rio de Janeiro, an underground economy and social network that linked quilombos , merchants, planters, indigenous persons, and other non-elite members of society. Gomes demonstrates that some quilombos offered an alternative social community to

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

wonders, “Who would ever choose this life?” There are a number of other films that represent Jesuits in a variety of ways: There is Irvin Kershner’s The Hoodlum Priest , William Friedkin’s ​ The Exorcist, Bruce Beresford’s Black Robe, and Costa-Gavras’s Amen , among others. Is the portrayal of the

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

The now two-decade-old renaissance in studies of the early modern inquisitions has reached a point where large-scale syntheses have begun to appear. The works of Christopher Black, Andrea Del Col, and Francisco Bethencourt in particular have provided overviews of inquisitorial operations across

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies